Articles Tagged with “Wire Fraud”

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It’s a catch-up blast of short wins today following my Spring Break.

My favorite of the bunch, continuing on our recent restitution cases, is United States v. Foley. There, the district court ordered restitution that was outside the offense of conviction. The First Circuit reversed. Go First Circuit!

To the victories!

you win.jpg1. United States v. Molina-Gomez, First Circuit: The district court erred by denying Appellant’s motion to suppress statements he made to United States Customs and Border Protection officers. The questioning occurred in a small, windowless room and Appellant was not given Miranda warnings prior to being questioned, which amounted to a violation of his Fifth Amendment rights. The case was remanded so Appellant could withdraw his plea and determine how he would like to proceed.

Defense Attorneys: Leonardo M. Aldridge-Kontos, Hector E. Guzman-Silva, Jr., Hector L. Ramos-Vega, and Lisa L. Rosado-Rodriguez
2. Perry v. Roy, First Circuit: Appellant, an inmate, brought a civil rights suit challenging the medical treatment he received after a violent scuffle with prison guards, which left him with a broken jaw. The trial court dismissed the case, holding that Appellant had not presented evidence that prison medical personnel deliberately denied him care. But the First Circuit concluded that the trial court had improperly weighed the evidence, which, when viewed in a light favorable to Appellant, could support a finding that the prison medical personnel were deliberately indifferent to Appellant’s condition.

Inmate’s Attorneys: Benjamin M. McGovern, Amanda O. Amendola

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The Seventh Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Hawkins – written by Easterbrook – presents a fascinating legal defense. When is getting money from someone for side benefits from the government bribery and when is it fraud?

Mr. Hawkins and his co-defendant Mr. Racasi worked in Chicago for the Board of Review – the entity that hears tax assessment appeals. They took money from a cop – Haleem – who they thought was dirty and, in fact, was – he was so dirty he was acting as an undercover officer to work his time down on some other criminal conduct of his.

It is an interesting question whether a dirty cop who has turned cooperator because his dirtiness has led to its own charges is truly “undercover” but let’s elide over that for a minute.

Messrs. Hawkins and Racasi took Mr. Haleem’s money so that they could work some influence at the Board that lowers tax assessments on some property Haleem owned. One of the properties didn’t have its assessment reduced, but the rest did.

They were charged with bribery and fraud in connection with the bribery. They were also charged with conspiracy, but that’s just because these days AUSAs get made fun of at the NAC if they don’t add a conspiracy charge to every case.

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In white-collar cases, loss drives the sentencing guidelines. If a person is convicted of a federal fraud charge, probably the single biggest legal issue that will matter to that person’s sentence is what the loss amount is.

By contrast, the biggest thing about the case that will matter is what judge the person draws. It’s better to have a great sentencing judge and a high loss amount than a low loss amount with a judge who sentences more aggressively.

But I digress.

money-choise-concept-1439274-m.jpgThe government’s view of most fraud cases, in my experience, benefits from the clarity of hindsight. After everything has fallen apart, it’s easy to see that, say, a person selling an investment vehicle was using a new investor’s funds to pay someone who is clamoring for his or her money back.

In hindsight, it’s easier to see a Ponzi scheme than it may be in the crush of the moment. Some people plan to run Ponzi schemes, others fall into them through circumstance. Such is the way of the world.

In any event, loss for a Ponzi scheme can be tricky. Generally, the loss amount under the sentencing guidelines is the amount of money that was reasonably foreseeable to be lost by the victims. And it’s what’s reasonably foreseeable for the person committing the crime.

Ok, fair enough. The trouble is with the “credit against loss” rule. The sentencing guidelines explain that when the person being sentenced has paid some money back before the authorities or the victims cottoned onto the scheme, that money should be deducted from the loss amount.

This makes sense. If my son steals $20 from my wallet, but feels bad and puts it back before I notice, he should get some credit for that.

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And, after a really long break, we’re back. Apologies. This day job has been very busy lately.

And, of course, if you ever find yourself jonesing for my writing, you can always check out my stuff on Above the Law.

You saw our guest post on Hite last week – it’s a great case that bears a close read.

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Lester and Nancy Sadler, a husband and wife, ran a series of pain management clinics in Ohio.

As the Sixth Circuit explained, “these were not conventional plain clinics.” For example, at one clinic

patients would arrive well before it opened, filling the clinic’s parking lot and the lots of nearby businesses. While waiting for the clinic to open, the patients used drugs and traded prescription forms for cash in the parking lots. The patients often traveled long distances (and in large groups) to come to the Sadlers’ shops, sometimes as much as 316 miles in a roundtrip, even though most of the patients lived much closer to other clinics.

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In this edition, I think the most interesting case (of a number of interesting cases) is United States v. Garcia.

There, the government had an agent testify as an expert. The Fourth Circuit reversed, because the agent’s “expert testimony” exceeded the bounds of what counts as expert testimony.

The way agents get qualified as experts is, often, nuts. It’s good to see the Fourth Circuit rolling it back.

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Last week was a busy week in the federal circuits. There’s a lot there to be interested in, especially if you have a case at the intersection of mental health issues and the law.

If, however, your interests are a bit more prosaic, you might want to read United States v. Ward. There, the person accused was convicted of defrauding different people than the indictment alleged he defrauded.

Amazing stuff.

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Gentle readers,

The Courts of Appeal have been more diligent in issuing opinions than we’ve been in posting them. Apologies. As those of you who do trial work can understand, sometimes it’s really hard to do anything other than eat and sleep when there are witnesses to prepare for and arguments to make. Alas.

That said, wow, these are a bunch of cases that a scholar of sentencing and supervised release law would love. Enjoy!

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It’s white-collar week here at the federal criminal appeals blog. Two big wins in white collar cases – a price fixing conspiracy case in U.S. v. Grimm and a sentencing win in a securities fraud case in U.S. v. Simmons.

It warms your heart right before the holidays.

This is also the last week to vote for this blog on the ABA Blog 100. Here’s the link – scroll down to the criminal justice blogs and you’ll find us.