Articles Tagged with “THIRD CIRCUIT”

Published on:

It’s a good week for violent crime in the federal circuits – a robbery case from the First Circuit and an assault in Indian country winding up in the Ninth Circuit. And both resulted in a defendant-friendly remand. Go federal appeals courts!

Though I suppose the big news from last’s week’s defense wins in the federal appeals courts is the Third Circuit’s United States v. Reynolds. There, the Third Circuit struck down a conviction for failing to register as a sex offender because the Attorney General’s rule that applied SORNA (the federal statute that federalizes sex offender registry – because Congress thinks there simply cannot be enough federal criminal statutes) wasn’t totally compliant with notice and comment rulemaking, in as much as there wasn’t an opportunity for notice and comment on the rule before it was made.

It’s a great issue – kudos to the Third Circuit for thinking the APA is the law even when it applies to people accused of crimes.

Published on:

The federal sentencing guidelines are probably the most problematic in three areas – fraud, child pornography, and drugs.

Today’s case, United States v. Diallo, illustrates two of the big problems with the fraud guidelines. First, they’re really complicated – so complicated that federal prosecutors sometimes don’t really understand how they work. In this case, the prosecutor at sentencing took a position so clearly inconsistent with the guidelines that the government abandoned it for the appeal.

(An astute reader will notice that this means the district court went along with the federal prosecutor’s flawed guidelines understanding. It’s a shame, but c’est la guerre.).

Published on:

Daniel Castro was a high-ranking person in the Philadelphia Police Department. And the Third Circuit’s opinion in his case – United States v. Castro – may just be the most awesome published opinion I’ve seen in months.

Mr. Castro was charged with three separate extortion conspiracies and also with making a false statement to federal agents – a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1001.

The jury hung on the extortion charges. They convicted on the false statement charge.

Published on:

It’s hard not to want to celebrate the orderly processes of government on the day after a Presidential Inauguration.

Though, for those of us who represent people accused of crimes, the “orderly processes of government” may feel a bit different. It’s good that we don’t have lynch mobs or posses with pitchforks chasing people who we think have violated the norms of our society.

But, as our President reminded us yesterday, our journey is not complete. Of course, most folks agree with the President that our journey is not complete until women earn equal pay, same sex couples can marry, voting rights are meaningful, and immigrants are welcomed.

Published on:

Who doesn’t love a good Franks hearing? Apparently the district court judge in the Seventh Circuit case of United States v. McMurtrey.

It’s a relatively quiet week in the federal circuit’s for defense victories. A Fourth Amendment win in the Tenth Circuit, a few sentencing remands, and, most exciting (for me) a Franks hearing remand in the Seventh.

To the victories!

Published on:

Michael Begin was a MySpace user. He used MySpace not so much to keep up with fan information about Twilight, but to make the acquaintance of a fourteen-year-old girl.

Though described as a twenty-year old Marine sniper on his MySpace profile, Mr. Begin was actually a 33 year old man with a history of convictions involving underage girls.

1382778_old_brick_cell_phone.jpgMr. Begin and the fourteen year old talked on MySpace often. Their conversations were sexual in nature. He also used his cell phone to send her two pictures which were perhaps inspired by Congressman Weiner. The girls’ mother became concerned. Her daughter told Mr. Begin that she was underage. Mr. Begin was undeterred.

Published on:

Last week saw a continuation of the short win trends we’ve seen in the past — federal sex crimes are frequently represented. Though this week is heavier on reversals involving enticing a minor.

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpgThe Ninth Circuit lets a man expand the record to investigate an ineffective assistance claim, the Third Circuit finds that an argument that trying to get someone to engage in statutory rape shouldn’t be worse than actually committing statutory rape makes some sense, and a bribery conviction is reversed in the Seventh Circuit because the evidence was insufficient. It’s not a bad week in federal criminal appeals.

1. Buenrostro v. United States, Ninth Circuit: Appellant filed several postconviction claims after he was convicted of conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of life imprisonment without parole based on his two prior felony drug convictions. Of those claims, the Ninth Circuit granted appellant’s motion to expand the record, which sought to reassert a previously raised ineffective assistance of trial counsel claim based on counsel’s alleged failure to communicate a plea offer.

Published on:

Today’s short wins are dominated by federal sex offenses and fraud. It must be something in the water.

As the last few have been, this post contains a number of cases that were decided over the end of the summer.

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpgVery soon — perhaps even next week — the Short Wins will start to become a recap of all the published federal criminal defense wins from each of the circuits on a weekly basis. So, if you’re an criminal appellate practitioner (on the defense side), our hope is that this will soon be one stop shopping for 28(j) letters.

Published on:

Glorious Shaver, Andrew White, and Jermel Lewis knew of a speakeasy in North Philadelphia.

A woman named Jeanette Ketchmore would buy bottles of booze and sell drinks from then for four or five dollars in her home. Some of those bottles of booze crossed state lines before making it to Ms. Ketchmore’s house.

1254218_glass_of_whiskey.jpgShe was not licensed by the state or local government to provide these drinks.

Published on:

James and Theresa DeMuro owned an engineering company in New Jersey called TAD Associates.

Not unlike yesterday’s tax case from the Eleventh Circuit, TAD Associates withheld money for taxes from its employees paychecks. TAD did not send that money along to the IRS.

The IRS approached the DeMuros about this. It was a civil matter at that point – the IRS required the DeMuros to set up a special trust account where they were to put their employees taxes.

Contact Information