Articles Tagged with Statements

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There are some good wins in the federal circuits from last week, but I think that perhaps the most interesting is U.S. v. Malenya.

The case deals, primarily, with supervised release conditions. I’ve seen some odd supervised release conditions, but this one takes the cake:

You shall notify the U.S. Probation Office when you establish a significant romantic relationship, and shall then inform the other party of your prior criminal history concerning your sex offenses. You understand that you must notify the U.S. Probation Office of that significant other’s address, age, and where the individual may be contacted.

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Last week was a great week for folks appealing a federal conviction.

In United States v. Garrido and again in United States v. Cone fraud convictions were reversed by the Ninth Circuit and the Fourth Circuit. Separately, in the Ninth Circuit, a conviction was reversed and remanded for a Miranda violation in United States v. Barnes.

There was also a bit of news in the continuing budget problems plaguing federal defender’s offices – two federal judges wrote a nice op-ed in the Washington Post about the problem.

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Brian Rogers learned the hard way that, sometimes, selling a computer has a downside. As many computer experts recommend, if you’re selling a computer you need to wipe the hard drive so that your financial information can’t be found by someone else.

Mr. Rogers, however, should not have been worried about the buyer of his computer finding his financial information. Rather, he should have worried about the purchaser finding his child pornography.

talk_costs_lives_vintage_us_ww2_war_poster-p228616753927944360t5wm_400Mr. Rogers was a non-commissioned Naval Officer at the Brunswick Naval Air Station in Maine. The police worked with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS, for those who don’t watch TV). Law enforcement obtained a search warrant.