Articles Tagged with “Special Conditions”

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It’s a catch-up blast of short wins today following my Spring Break.

My favorite of the bunch, continuing on our recent restitution cases, is United States v. Foley. There, the district court ordered restitution that was outside the offense of conviction. The First Circuit reversed. Go First Circuit!

To the victories!

you win.jpg1. United States v. Molina-Gomez, First Circuit: The district court erred by denying Appellant’s motion to suppress statements he made to United States Customs and Border Protection officers. The questioning occurred in a small, windowless room and Appellant was not given Miranda warnings prior to being questioned, which amounted to a violation of his Fifth Amendment rights. The case was remanded so Appellant could withdraw his plea and determine how he would like to proceed.

Defense Attorneys: Leonardo M. Aldridge-Kontos, Hector E. Guzman-Silva, Jr., Hector L. Ramos-Vega, and Lisa L. Rosado-Rodriguez
2. Perry v. Roy, First Circuit: Appellant, an inmate, brought a civil rights suit challenging the medical treatment he received after a violent scuffle with prison guards, which left him with a broken jaw. The trial court dismissed the case, holding that Appellant had not presented evidence that prison medical personnel deliberately denied him care. But the First Circuit concluded that the trial court had improperly weighed the evidence, which, when viewed in a light favorable to Appellant, could support a finding that the prison medical personnel were deliberately indifferent to Appellant’s condition.

Inmate’s Attorneys: Benjamin M. McGovern, Amanda O. Amendola

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There are two cases in this batch of short wins that I think deserve a special shout out.

First, there’s United States v. Torres-Perez. Appeal waivers are the bane of federal criminal practice (or one of them). Their only advantage is that they make prosecutors’ lives easier. The downside, which is significant, is that they discourage the development of the law. I’d rather have the government work more and know what the law is. Though I may be crazy. In Perez, the Fifth Circuit slapped down an appeal waiver requirement in order to get credit for a acceptance.

Second, there’s United States v. Barta – another great entrapment case from the Seventh Circuit. That circuit is bustin out entrapment cases like Taylor Swift and Katy Perry bust out insults of each other. Or something.

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It’s been an interesting week in the federal circuits. Aside from the normal and expected sentencing appeals, there are two cases that caught my eye.

The first is United States v. Fard on withdrawing a plea. I often hear from people who have entered a plea and want to talk about hiring me to withdraw it. It can be maddening to see how other lawyers have poorly advised their clients, or have simply had them enter pleas that their client does not understand (sometimes, especially when the lawyer has no prior criminal defense experience, I fear the lawyer doesn’t understand the plea either). Fard helps, a bit, in attacking pleas that aren’t knowing and voluntary.

The second case I find interesting solely for the schaedenfraude it gives me. The case is United States v. Smith. There, an AUSA was appointed and confirmed to be a judge. As a judge, he worked on a case he also worked on as an AUSA. Hijinks ensue.

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And, after a really long break, we’re back. Apologies. This day job has been very busy lately.

And, of course, if you ever find yourself jonesing for my writing, you can always check out my stuff on Above the Law.

You saw our guest post on Hite last week – it’s a great case that bears a close read.

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It’s been an interesting few weeks in the circuits (and, apologies for the gap in posting – pesky family vacations).

Probably my favorite is United States v. Mergen, about whether an FBI agent’s statements that what the guy charged with a crime was doing were ok and legal were admissible. I tend to think FBI stings that take advantage of how weak the entrapment defense is are one of the more loathsome things our federal government does – any time you can poke holes in that I think it’s a good thing.

Also of note is United States v. Bagdy – there, a guy who spent an inheritance on stuff that wasn’t restitution, instead of restitution, didn’t violate his supervised release conditions. Supervised release can be insane – especially when restitution is in play. Nice work for the Third Circuit in dialing it back.

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There’s been a lot in the circuits in the last week, but perhaps the most surprising bit is that the Seventh Circuit issued four opinions on supervised release conditions.

Supervised release may not be the sexiest of issues, but, especially in child pornography cases, it matters a lot. I’m not sure what’s in the water in Chicago, but whatever it is reaffirms that these conditions need to be narrowly tailored and properly justified.

To the victories!

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There are two interesting opinions I’d like to highlight from this crop.

First, there’s United States v. Prado from the Seventh Circuit. Every now and again, in sentencing, a district court will say it can’t consider something. It seems to me that whatever that something is, these days, a district court can probably consider it. Prado is another example of that proposition.

More sensationally, check out the Ninth Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Maloney! Laura Duffy, the AUSA for the Southern District of California, watched the en banc argument in this case, decided the government’s position was wrong and asked the Ninth Circuit to vacate the conviction. Nice.