Articles Tagged with SORNA

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In this set of short wins, the one that I’d like to call attention to is United States v. Cuti.

Restitution is not a sexy issue. It isn’t as fun to read about as, say, a Brady fight, or a glaring evidentiary problem at a trial. But it’s important.

Restitution judgments can be massive and, frankly, too many lawyers, judges, and prosecutors phone it in around restitution. United States v. Cuti clarifies that what counts as restitution is not just any money that any person may have spent as a result of the criminal conduct at the heart of the case. If you’ve got a restitution issue coming up, give it a read. Nice stuff.

To the victories!

you win.jpg1. United States v. Cuti.pdf, Second Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiracy to make false statements and securities fraud. His sentence included an award of restitution under the Victims and Witnesses Protection Act. The Second Circuit held that legal expenses incurred in connection with a civil arbitration connected to the offense are not deemed “necessary” under the VWPA because they were not undertaken or pursued in aid of the prosecution. In addition, the court held that non-victims are eligible for restitution only to the extent such payments were made on behalf of the victim, and remanded for reconsideration of the restitution order.

Defense Attorneys: Brian C. Brook and Matthew J. Peed
2. United States v. Price, Fourth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to failing to register as a sex offender and the district court adopted Guidelines based on the fact that such an offense qualified as a ‘sex offense’. That interpretation was wrong; failing to register as a sex offender does not qualify as a sex offense. The court therefore remanded for resentencing under different sentencing guidelines.

Defense Attorneys: Kimberly Harvey Albro and John H. Hare

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I’m writing this from the Fourth Circuit Judicial Conference. Here’s my brief recap.

Today, Brian Stevenson, a tremendously cool death penalty lawyer told the assembled group that justice for poor folks and people of color is going to be more likely if decision makers are in closer proximity to poor folks and people of color.

Yesterday, there was a talk about how to improve your home security, to keep any one who wants to get in proximity to you from doing so.

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It’s a good week for violent crime in the federal circuits – a robbery case from the First Circuit and an assault in Indian country winding up in the Ninth Circuit. And both resulted in a defendant-friendly remand. Go federal appeals courts!

Though I suppose the big news from last’s week’s defense wins in the federal appeals courts is the Third Circuit’s United States v. Reynolds. There, the Third Circuit struck down a conviction for failing to register as a sex offender because the Attorney General’s rule that applied SORNA (the federal statute that federalizes sex offender registry – because Congress thinks there simply cannot be enough federal criminal statutes) wasn’t totally compliant with notice and comment rulemaking, in as much as there wasn’t an opportunity for notice and comment on the rule before it was made.

It’s a great issue – kudos to the Third Circuit for thinking the APA is the law even when it applies to people accused of crimes.