Articles Tagged with “Sixth Circuit”

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There’s been a lot of action in the federal circuits these first few weeks of the year, and here, in one post we have a lot of it.

One shout out in particular is U.S. v. Aparicio-Soria. The Fourth Circuit weighs in on resisting arrest. Is it always a crime of violence? Surely not, but, well, it takes a while for things to get to that point.

Congratulations Sapna Mirchandani for a nice win!

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Happy Monday!

We have three short but good cases from the circuits from last week. I think my favorite is U.S. v. Glover, a nice suppression case. Congrats to Adam Kurland for the win.

To the victories!

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Congress these days seems to have noticed that we have too many federal criminal laws – which is a good thing (the Congressional notice, less the excessive criminal laws).

Last week, the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony on overcriminalization of regulatory crimes. The Hill has a nice write-up in “Regulation horror stories for Halloween.”

Here’s the intro:

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Due to my own sloth, we’re presenting two weeks of short wins in one post. Here it is!

There are some good cases here, featuring the Armed Career Criminal Act, the Fourth Amendment, and law enforcement agents testifying as experts.

In other news, the Sentencing Commission has put out two “quick fact” sheets. One is on “Theft Property Destruction and Fraud” and the other is on Mandatory Minimum Penalties.pdf. My favorite fun fact – the median loss in federal fraud cases is $95,408.

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On this, the Monday after Labor Day, I suspect many of us have the feeling that work piles up when you leave the office. And, with last week off from Short Wins, that’s definitely what happened here.

Without further ado, to the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. Miller v. United States, Fourth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. For appellant’s two prior convictions (upon which the instant offense was based), he was sentenced to 6 to 8 months for each offense. He filed a 28 U.S.C. § 2255 motion to vacate his sentence, arguing that his prior convictions were not qualifying predicate convictions. The court agreed, vacated appellant’s conviction, and remanded for the petition to be granted.

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It’s been a busy week in the circuits. But first, two news items.

Eric Holder Walks Back The War On Drugs

Today, as has been widely reported, Eric Holder will announce that “widespread incarceration at the federal, state and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable.” Here’s coverage at the Wall Street Journal.

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Placido Mendoza drove a truck from North Carolina to Tennessee. His passenger was Abel Tavera.

Tavera was a roofer. He later said (to a jury) that he thought he was going to Tennessee to see a construction project.

23.jpgThe truck had construction equipment in it. And a bucket containing nails.

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It’s a bit of a sleepy week in the circuits, but not too sleepy in the news.

BOP Coverts Danbury to a Men’s Prison

In Slate, Yale law professor Judith Resnik wrote about the problems facing female inmates in the Bureau of Prisons (hat tip to Todd Bussert’s BOP Blog).

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It’s been a busy week in the federal circuits – lots of good wins to check out.

Also, while I’m shamelessly pimping, please check out an article I wrote for the National Law Journal here about DOJ prosecutions, pleas, and why the law ought to be clearer.

To the victories!

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