Articles Tagged with “Search Warrant”

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When police officers can lie and about what they can lie is a recurring issue in criminal appeals. Courts have found that not telling the truth can be a useful tool in investigations, but is checked by the Constitution. For example, a detective can, while interrogating a suspect, lie about the evidence the police already have in their possession. Police can lie about the real reason for stopping a driver — they say it was for speeding, but in fact was because they believed the driver was a drug dealer. But, police cannot tell you they have a search warrant when, in fact, they do not have one.
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There’s been a lot in the circuits in the last week, but perhaps the most surprising bit is that the Seventh Circuit issued four opinions on supervised release conditions.

Supervised release may not be the sexiest of issues, but, especially in child pornography cases, it matters a lot. I’m not sure what’s in the water in Chicago, but whatever it is reaffirms that these conditions need to be narrowly tailored and properly justified.

To the victories!

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Today’s featured case is United States v. Hampton for a few reasons.

First, it’s from the DC Circuit, and my office is in DC – our Circuit’s pro-defendant decisions are particularly exciting (to me).

Second, it involves law enforcement agents offering expert testimony. Law enforcement testimony is massively frustrating – it feels, at times, that there no bounds to what an FBI Agent will testify about.

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October 29, 2007 started bad for Cortez Fisher.

He walked out of his house and the Baltimore police approached him (he lived in Baltimore). They asked to talk to him. He said no. He tried to drive away, but backed into a cop car.

He was arrested and searched – they found empty glass vials in his pants pocket.

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Someone told the police that Chunon Bailey sold drugs. Worse, he sold drugs and had a gun at his house at 103 Lake Drive in Wyandanch, New York.

That someone was a confidential informant.

The police took that tip and got a search warrant for 103 Lake Drive.