Articles Tagged with robbery

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Aggravated identity theft – charged under 1028A – seems like it’s getting more and more popular among federal prosecutors. It does come with massive leverage in plea negotiations; a conviction for a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1028A carries a mandatory 2 years in prison, consecutive to any other count of conviction. I’m starting to see these in cases beyond the garden variety identity fraud gift card cases – like tax and health care fraud.

The statute says that for subsequent 1028A convictions, a district court has discretion whether to stack them. And United States v. Chibuko addresses exactly that issue and the importance of reading a statute.

To the victories!

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Gentle readers,

The Courts of Appeal have been more diligent in issuing opinions than we’ve been in posting them. Apologies. As those of you who do trial work can understand, sometimes it’s really hard to do anything other than eat and sleep when there are witnesses to prepare for and arguments to make. Alas.

That said, wow, these are a bunch of cases that a scholar of sentencing and supervised release law would love. Enjoy!

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It’s a good week for violent crime in the federal circuits – a robbery case from the First Circuit and an assault in Indian country winding up in the Ninth Circuit. And both resulted in a defendant-friendly remand. Go federal appeals courts!

Though I suppose the big news from last’s week’s defense wins in the federal appeals courts is the Third Circuit’s United States v. Reynolds. There, the Third Circuit struck down a conviction for failing to register as a sex offender because the Attorney General’s rule that applied SORNA (the federal statute that federalizes sex offender registry – because Congress thinks there simply cannot be enough federal criminal statutes) wasn’t totally compliant with notice and comment rulemaking, in as much as there wasn’t an opportunity for notice and comment on the rule before it was made.

It’s a great issue – kudos to the Third Circuit for thinking the APA is the law even when it applies to people accused of crimes.

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Someone shot Eric Davis. He wasn’t hurt badly, but he was mad.

The next day, someone told him that the man who shot him was near a high school. Mr. Davis went to the high school. He saw Octavious Wilkins, and took Mr. Wilkins as the man who shot him.

Mr. Davis, and friends, approached Mr. Wilkins. They had guns drawn.