Articles Tagged with Resentencing

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The First Circuit’s decision in United States v. Lopez-Pastrana, 15-1894 (1st. Cir. May 4, 2018) is long, but can be summed up simply: federal courts can’t impose a term of supervised release on a charge that resulted in no prison time, even if the sentencing court is trying to help the defendant obtain federally-subsidized medical care for a serious condition.  Here’s what happened in Lopez-Pastrana:

The Government charged Mr. Lopez-Pastrana with two drug crimes and two weapons crimes.  He entered into a plea agreement.  Mr. Lopez-Pastrana would plead guilty to possession of marijuana with intent to distribute (Count III) and possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking (Count IV).  In exchange, the Government would dismiss Counts I and II.  The agreed-upon (but non-binding) sentencing range was zero to six months imprisonment for Count III, and a 60 month mandatory-minimum on Count IV.  Of course, there was an appeal waiver in the plea agreement.

At sentencing, Mr. Lopez-Pastrana explained he has Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (“COPD”), which, if you believe the commercial, makes you feel like an elephant or some other large animal is sitting on your chest.  His sentencing attorney told the district court that Mr. Lopez-Pastrana had a 20% chance of surviving the next four years.  The Government thought he was overstating the matter.  According to the Government, the Bureau of Prisons represented that “his medical condition is not an end-stage disease” and that his condition had improved during the four months he was incarcerated and awaiting sentencing.  (Aside: BOP has a very high opinion of its ability to care for sick people.  Check out the 11th Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Seecharan, where a defendant’s doctor opined the defendant would die of infection if he went to prison, and the district court ordered incarceration based on BOP’s response was that it “could handle anything.”  Happily, the 11th Circuit reversed for resentencing).

Back to Mr. Lopez-Pastrana. The district court sentenced him to 60 months in a prison medical facility on Count IV, with 5 years of supervised release.  But the sentence on Count III engendered some debate.  The district court basically gave Mr. Lopez-Pastrana an ultimatum.  Option 1: 12 months of home confinement with federally funded medical care as a condition of supervised release, and no time in prison.  Option 2: 6 months in prison.  Mr. Lopez-Pastrana took the 12 months of home confinement and appealed.

Michael Brownlee is board-certified as an appellate expert by the Florida Bar.  He practices in federal appellate courts around the country and is the founding member of The Brownlee Law Firm.  To learn more visit appealattorney.com or email Mike at mbrownlee@brownleelawfirmpa.com.

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Gentle readers,

The Courts of Appeal have been more diligent in issuing opinions than we’ve been in posting them. Apologies. As those of you who do trial work can understand, sometimes it’s really hard to do anything other than eat and sleep when there are witnesses to prepare for and arguments to make. Alas.

That said, wow, these are a bunch of cases that a scholar of sentencing and supervised release law would love. Enjoy!

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Before we get to the last week’s wins in the federal circuits, three things:

First, I think the most interesting opinion from the federal circuits in the last week is United States v. Murray from the Second Circuit. Trials in criminal cases may be statistically anomalous, but you still have to let the defendant put on his case.

Second, I can’t strongly recommend enough the article in the December 9 issue of the New Yorker on false confessions (sadly, subscription is required). If you’re a law geek, there’s a lot in the New Yorker this week for you – including a piece by Jeffery Toobin on why the Constitution is really dusty (login required). More on that piece from Above the Law is here.

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It’s a sleepy week in the Circuits last week – a resentencing and a restitution remand.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Daniels, et al., Fifth Circuit: Appellants were convicted of conspiring to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine. The finding as to drug quantity was vacated because there was insufficient evidence to support it. Appellants’ sentences were vacated and the case remanded for resentencing for the court to recalculate appellants’ Guidelines range calculations, which were driven by the conspiracy’s vacated five kilogram finding.

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There are some great cases from the Ninth and Eleventh Circuits this week – especially United States v. Ermoian on obstruction of justice. Good times.

And, of course, the big news of last week was Eric Holder’s recognition that there are a lot of people in federal prison. I’m skeptical that a policy that lets folks with one or two criminal history points avoid a mandatory minimum is going to do much to reduce our prison population, as I told some folks last week, but if the Attorney General is going to pay lip service to an idea, I suppose I’m glad it’s an idea that I agree with.

To the victories!

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It’s a good week in the circuits for folks accused of federal crimes.

The Seventh Circuit has been active (though sadly without Judge Posner). United States v. Diaz-Rios looks interesting – it’s a remand for resentencing in a mitigation role case. Personally, I think the mitigating role reduction is too rarely applied (though I would say that). I’m always happy to see pro-defendant law made on that guideline.

Perhaps most interesting, though, is United States v. Doe – a Ninth Circuit discovery violation case. Looks like all of DOJ’s Brady training may not have eliminated the whole problem. Shocking.