Articles Tagged with “Mortgage Fraud”

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United States v. Fard is a nice study in the wrong way for a lawyer to handle a plea hearing.

Let me say, at the start, that I get that a plea hearing can be hard. Sometimes a lawyer sees what’s in his client’s best interests more clearly than the client. There can be a temptation to push a client really hard to take a plea when the client doesn’t want to. And getting a client who has reluctantly inked a plea through a plea hearing can also be hard.

There are few things you can do to handle that. Maybe you spend more time with the client explaining why a plea makes sense. Maybe you talk – with permission – to the client’s loved ones about whether a plea makes sense. Maybe, if the client doesn’t want to plead, you reflect that it’s the client’s Sixth Amendment right to go to trial, and not the lawyer’s and you take the case to trial.

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It’s been an interesting week in the federal circuits. Aside from the normal and expected sentencing appeals, there are two cases that caught my eye.

The first is United States v. Fard on withdrawing a plea. I often hear from people who have entered a plea and want to talk about hiring me to withdraw it. It can be maddening to see how other lawyers have poorly advised their clients, or have simply had them enter pleas that their client does not understand (sometimes, especially when the lawyer has no prior criminal defense experience, I fear the lawyer doesn’t understand the plea either). Fard helps, a bit, in attacking pleas that aren’t knowing and voluntary.

The second case I find interesting solely for the schaedenfraude it gives me. The case is United States v. Smith. There, an AUSA was appointed and confirmed to be a judge. As a judge, he worked on a case he also worked on as an AUSA. Hijinks ensue.

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There were a handful of good wins in the federal circuits last week. Notably, United States v. Annabi, pushed back on a government forfeiture because the language in the indictment was inadequate. Forfeiture is a huge issue in criminal cases in federal court these days – it’s good to see the home team winning in this area.

Also of note is In re Joannie Plaza-Martinez dealing with a sanction of an AFPD. It’s sad to see a criminal defense lawyer sanctioned, especially an AFPD. So it’s nice to see that sanction reversed.

To the victories!

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William Cloud believed in the American dream of home ownership. He worked to make buying a home easy for people in his community.

He wanted to make buying a house easy, even if it would be the second or third house that a person would own.

1389529_house.jpgTo make sure the houses he was helping people buy were up to snuff, he’d buy them first and do some work on them. He’d then sell them – or, using the government’s language – he’d “flip” them to the people he was helping to become real estate investors.

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Like many Americans, Meggan Alexander wanted to participate in the dream of home ownership. Like many Americans, Ms. Alexander had lost her job.

Unlike many Americans, Meggan Alexander signed documents at a real estate closing that said she was employed when she wasn’t.

1117134_contract_2.jpgThe government can be a stickler for proper paperwork. Because she signed these documents saying that she was employed when she wasn’t, she was indicted for making a false statement with the intent to influence an FDIC-insured entity.

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What’s the point of prosecuting crime? What’s the point of putting people in prison?

Surely, in any well-functioning society – let alone any well-functioning democracy – there are a number of good reasons for prosecuting crime. There are also some that are not as obviously good.

Prosecuting crime prevents the people who commit crimes from being in a position to commit further crimes. Specific deterrence – deterring the specific person – makes sense as a function of sentencing.