Articles Tagged with “Mandatory Minimums”

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It’s a catch-up blast of short wins today following my Spring Break.

My favorite of the bunch, continuing on our recent restitution cases, is United States v. Foley. There, the district court ordered restitution that was outside the offense of conviction. The First Circuit reversed. Go First Circuit!

To the victories!

you win.jpg1. United States v. Molina-Gomez, First Circuit: The district court erred by denying Appellant’s motion to suppress statements he made to United States Customs and Border Protection officers. The questioning occurred in a small, windowless room and Appellant was not given Miranda warnings prior to being questioned, which amounted to a violation of his Fifth Amendment rights. The case was remanded so Appellant could withdraw his plea and determine how he would like to proceed.

Defense Attorneys: Leonardo M. Aldridge-Kontos, Hector E. Guzman-Silva, Jr., Hector L. Ramos-Vega, and Lisa L. Rosado-Rodriguez
2. Perry v. Roy, First Circuit: Appellant, an inmate, brought a civil rights suit challenging the medical treatment he received after a violent scuffle with prison guards, which left him with a broken jaw. The trial court dismissed the case, holding that Appellant had not presented evidence that prison medical personnel deliberately denied him care. But the First Circuit concluded that the trial court had improperly weighed the evidence, which, when viewed in a light favorable to Appellant, could support a finding that the prison medical personnel were deliberately indifferent to Appellant’s condition.

Inmate’s Attorneys: Benjamin M. McGovern, Amanda O. Amendola

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Today’s featured defense victory is United States v. Barefoot, which deals with a kind of surprising course of conduct in the Fourth Circuit. In Barefoot, a person gave information to the government to help them investigate other crimes. The information was given on the condition that the information not be used to prosecute him. The government broke that condition.

Happily though, the Fourth Circuit enforced it.

To the victories!

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Congress these days seems to have noticed that we have too many federal criminal laws – which is a good thing (the Congressional notice, less the excessive criminal laws).

Last week, the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony on overcriminalization of regulatory crimes. The Hill has a nice write-up in “Regulation horror stories for Halloween.”

Here’s the intro:

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I was lucky last week to be able to get together with a fan of this blog (yes, there are fans of this blog who are not my mother. I’m kind of surprised too.).

The reader I was lucky to meet with had a wonderful suggestion. He saw the point behind not doing a full treatment of each case, as I described earlier.

Yet, he said, I could still do a very quick treatment of each case, even if not every case gets the loving and lengthy discussion that may be the reason folks read this and is the fun behind writing it.

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The federal government has powerful tools to keep a person from exercising his constitutional right to go to trial – like crushingly long mandatory minimum sentences.

An aside to illustrate the point

The government’s use of mandatory minimums reminds me of the plea colloquy of a particularly honest client of mine.