Articles Tagged with “Mail Fraud”

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In white-collar cases, loss drives the sentencing guidelines. If a person is convicted of a federal fraud charge, probably the single biggest legal issue that will matter to that person’s sentence is what the loss amount is.

By contrast, the biggest thing about the case that will matter is what judge the person draws. It’s better to have a great sentencing judge and a high loss amount than a low loss amount with a judge who sentences more aggressively.

But I digress.

money-choise-concept-1439274-m.jpgThe government’s view of most fraud cases, in my experience, benefits from the clarity of hindsight. After everything has fallen apart, it’s easy to see that, say, a person selling an investment vehicle was using a new investor’s funds to pay someone who is clamoring for his or her money back.

In hindsight, it’s easier to see a Ponzi scheme than it may be in the crush of the moment. Some people plan to run Ponzi schemes, others fall into them through circumstance. Such is the way of the world.

In any event, loss for a Ponzi scheme can be tricky. Generally, the loss amount under the sentencing guidelines is the amount of money that was reasonably foreseeable to be lost by the victims. And it’s what’s reasonably foreseeable for the person committing the crime.

Ok, fair enough. The trouble is with the “credit against loss” rule. The sentencing guidelines explain that when the person being sentenced has paid some money back before the authorities or the victims cottoned onto the scheme, that money should be deducted from the loss amount.

This makes sense. If my son steals $20 from my wallet, but feels bad and puts it back before I notice, he should get some credit for that.

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There are two cases in this batch of short wins that I think deserve a special shout out.

First, there’s United States v. Torres-Perez. Appeal waivers are the bane of federal criminal practice (or one of them). Their only advantage is that they make prosecutors’ lives easier. The downside, which is significant, is that they discourage the development of the law. I’d rather have the government work more and know what the law is. Though I may be crazy. In Perez, the Fifth Circuit slapped down an appeal waiver requirement in order to get credit for a acceptance.

Second, there’s United States v. Barta – another great entrapment case from the Seventh Circuit. That circuit is bustin out entrapment cases like Taylor Swift and Katy Perry bust out insults of each other. Or something.

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And, after a really long break, we’re back. Apologies. This day job has been very busy lately.

And, of course, if you ever find yourself jonesing for my writing, you can always check out my stuff on Above the Law.

You saw our guest post on Hite last week – it’s a great case that bears a close read.

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Gentle readers,

The Courts of Appeal have been more diligent in issuing opinions than we’ve been in posting them. Apologies. As those of you who do trial work can understand, sometimes it’s really hard to do anything other than eat and sleep when there are witnesses to prepare for and arguments to make. Alas.

That said, wow, these are a bunch of cases that a scholar of sentencing and supervised release law would love. Enjoy!

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It’s generally a slow time of year between Christmas and New Year’s, but the federal circuits have been busy. But who wouldn’t want to start the year with a remand in a criminal case (other than the government)?

Since we were off last week, here are the wins from the last two weeks in the federal circuits.

Happy New Year!

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Last week’s wins are below – and there are some great reads.

But today, let’s congratulate Greg Poe for his work challenging sanctions imposed on a fine career AFPD in the Sixth Circuit.

Here’s a link to the opinion.

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Our brave new world of internet technology is encouraging innovation of all kinds. Innovation of new ways to interact with each other, new ways to learn, new ways to work, new ways to embezzle and create records of one’s embezzlement, and new ways for the government to try to prosecute.

In United States v. Phillips, the Ninth Circuit – in an opinion written by S.D.N.Y. SuperJudge Rakoff sitting by designation – brushed back a prosecution for embezzlement from a tech company.

1369865_mailbox.jpgThe government, you see, prosecuted a former CEO of a tech company for mail fraud.

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Happy New Year!

In our first “Short Wins” of the new year, the Eighth Circuit reverses a district court’s order restricting a person in BOP custody from communicating with folks on the outside, the Ninth Circuit reverses on a career offender determination, and the Sixth Circuit reversed when a district court didn’t give a person counsel in a competency hearing.

My personal favorite, though, is the Ninth Circuit’s remand in a mail fraud case that, the court of appeals determined did not involve the mails.