Articles Tagged with “Illegal Reentry”

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It’s a dog’s breakfast of victories in the nation’s federal criminal appellate courts.

Personally, I love a good case on the district court’s contempt power — look to see the Fourth Circuit’s contempt reversal in United States v. Peoples profiled in more depth a little later in the week. The case has everything — a pro se litigant, a finding of contempt, and profanity (which is tastefully referred to in the opinion). It reminds me of another great pro se contempt case from last year. It reminds me, too, of the Sixth Circuit’s relatively recent case on the limits of a district court’s power to sanction a lawyer. Always good stuff.

Which is not to give short shrift to the two other wins from last week — resentencing in an illegal reentry case and unsupported supervised release conditions in a federal sex case.

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One of the most jarring things about federal criminal practice, especially for lawyers who are well trained in civil litigation – is how many procedural rights and doctrines don’t apply.

You want to move for summary judgment? No such motion exists (as a general matter, but see this post).

You want to take a deposition? You’re likely out of luck. (Yes, that’s right, you get more information about the other side’s case in a civil case – which is only about money – than you do in a criminal case where someone might go to prison).

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Winston Churchill is famous for his “Never Give In” speech.

They must be watching that speech in the Federal Defenders of San Diego, particularly in that office’s representation of Carlos Jesus Marguet-Pillado. Those lawyers did tremendous work for their client, solely because they never gave up. See the Ninth Circuit’s recent opinion in United States v. Marguet-Pillado.

Mr. Marguet-Pillado was charged with illegal reentry. To be convicted, the government has to prove that he is an alien who was previously deported from the country and who came back without permission.