Articles Tagged with “Health Care Fraud”

Published on:

Child porn cases are turning out to be a surprisingly large portion of what’s in federal court.

Child pornography is gross and wrong, to be clear. But these cases are, I think, a symptom of a larger problem.

All of us have times in our lives when we’re in the wilderness, when we feel adrift and alienated and unsure of where we’re going or where we are. Some folks in this time of life turn to alcohol, Some turn to drugs, video games, or other ways to keep themselves from facing the great chasm of dissatisfaction that their lives have become. “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desparation” and all that.

Published on:

Remember back with this blog was more than just Short Wins? Remember when there were long and loving descriptions of cases?

I still aspire to get back to that vision for the blog – that was fun. Seriously, look for more long write-ups soon. I’ve been distracted by writing for Above the Law (here is a link to my columns (I particularly like the one about cannibalism)) and my day job as a practicing lawyer.

But, if you’re jonesing for those long write-ups again, thanks to the good people at James Publishing, you can now read them in one handy-dandy book. It has the jazzy title Criminal Defense Victories in the Federal Circuits. Or you could just read the archives.

Published on:

Aggravated identity theft – charged under 1028A – seems like it’s getting more and more popular among federal prosecutors. It does come with massive leverage in plea negotiations; a conviction for a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1028A carries a mandatory 2 years in prison, consecutive to any other count of conviction. I’m starting to see these in cases beyond the garden variety identity fraud gift card cases – like tax and health care fraud.

The statute says that for subsequent 1028A convictions, a district court has discretion whether to stack them. And United States v. Chibuko addresses exactly that issue and the importance of reading a statute.

To the victories!

Published on:

It’s a grab bag of victories in the federal circuits for last week. A few sentencing remands – including one based on a loss calculation in a health care fraud case – but the most interesting remand is in the First Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Delgado-Marrero.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Delgado-Marrero, First Circuit: Delgado-Marrero and Rivera-Claudio were both convicted by a jury of drug and gun charges and sentenced to 15 years in prison. Delgado-Marrero was granted a new trial because the district court erred by excluding testimony of a defense witness. The First Circuit also found error with regard to Rivera-Claudio’s sentence because the district court failed to properly instruct the jury that in answering a post-verdict special question regarding quantity of drugs, they needed to be sure of the quantity beyond a reasonable doubt.

Published on:

Hiring is always hard, especially in a small office.

You have work that needs to be done. You can’t do it all. Maybe you’re a professional, like a doctor, and some of the work isn’t the best use of your time.

So you hire someone to help. Really, how much do you know about a person as the result of a hiring process? Yet, despite that, you give them responsibility over a portion of your business.

Published on:

There was only one published criminal case in the federal circuits last week where the defendant won. It’s a good case on jury instructions for missing evidence, and the short write up is below.

In other news – I stumbled across this lovely write up of a Medicare Fraud prosecution by a doctor.

I often am talking to people who are amazed at how the federal criminal justice system works when they encounter it for the first time. The article is titled “Is a charting error a federal crime?” (spoiler alert: the author thinks that it is, but shouldn’t be)

Published on:

Two doctors, married to each other, were accused of health care fraud. They pled guilty and fought at sentencing about the amount of the restitution that they would have to pay back to the insurance companies for what they did. And, in United States v. Sharma, the Fifth Circuit held that a district court can’t just make up a restitution number.

Dr. Arun Sharma and Dr. Kiran Sharma ran two pain management clinics in Texas.

1028452_syringes_and_vial.jpgAt these clinics, the Doctors Sharma would give pain injections to patients. The health care fraud involved “paravertebral facet-point injections.”

Published on:

One would have thought that, with the end of the world predicted for Friday of last week, our nation’s appellate courts would have spent their last week on Earth with family or friends, rather than cranking out wins for folks charged with federal crimes.

Perhaps circuit court judges have access to better science than those who thought that the movie 2012 was a documentary set in the future. Our federal courts of appeal cranked out a whopping 6 victories for people accused of crimes in federal court last week. Perhaps they were simply trying to clear their docket up for more relaxed figgy pudding on Tuesday.

There are some good cases here involving a wide range of federal criminal topics – restitution, gun sentencing, trial sequestration, stalking using a telecommunications device, and civil rights violations. It’s a nice stocking stuffer of law for this slow week.

Published on:

When a person is convicted of a federal crime, especially in a fraud case, but in lots of other kinds of federal criminal cases too, the district court sometimes also orders that the person pay restitution.

The point of restitution is that the person has to pay back any money that they took – they have to make any victims of the crime whole again.

To satisfy a restitution judgment, the federal government can go try to get that money from assets that a person has – they can go after bank accounts and retirement accounts and houses.

Published on:

Medicare is a huge federal program. It’s also a huge source of criminal liability for doctors and other health care providers, as they try to comply with the byzantine regulations for billing issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Take United States v. Jones as an example.

1334532_ambulance.jpgStatewide Physical Medical Group