Articles Tagged with “Gun Crimes”

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One would have thought that, with the end of the world predicted for Friday of last week, our nation’s appellate courts would have spent their last week on Earth with family or friends, rather than cranking out wins for folks charged with federal crimes.

Perhaps circuit court judges have access to better science than those who thought that the movie 2012 was a documentary set in the future. Our federal courts of appeal cranked out a whopping 6 victories for people accused of crimes in federal court last week. Perhaps they were simply trying to clear their docket up for more relaxed figgy pudding on Tuesday.

There are some good cases here involving a wide range of federal criminal topics – restitution, gun sentencing, trial sequestration, stalking using a telecommunications device, and civil rights violations. It’s a nice stocking stuffer of law for this slow week.

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The D.C. Circuit, normally an infrequent presence on this blog, has two cases in one week!

One involves Osama bin Laden’s driver and his happy adventures with retroactivity. The was a remand for a judge who thought that a below guidelines sentence is only appropriate when there are “compelling reasons” to go below the guidelines range.

There’s also go action in a Sixth Circuit meth case involving the Fourth Amendment, and a crime of violence case out of the Tenth Circuit.

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Michael Louchart sold some guns. They were stolen and he knew it.

The feds caught up to him and charged him with conspiracy to steal firearms and with receiving and selling stolen firearms, each of which violated 18 U.S.C. § 922. In the indictment, the government said that Mr. Louchart was involved in the theft of more than 75 firearms.

It’s not a coincidence that if a person steals more than 75 firearms they are then eligible for a sentencing enhancement under the sentencing guidelines.

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Last year came to be known as the year that the Fourth Amendment rose again in Richmond, Virginia.

The Fourth Circuit held that police conduct violated the Fourth Amendment here, here, here, here, and here.

Last week, the Fourth Circuit did it again.

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Like many Americans, Benjamin Carter liked to smoke marijuana. He also lived in a bad neighborhood, and worried about being the victim of crime.

Even though 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(3) says that it is a crime for any person “who is an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance” to possess a firearm, Mr. Carter did just that.

52691_marijuana_plant.jpgWhen the government found out about his guns and his marijuana habit, they charged him violating section 922(g)(3).

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Criminal history is important and complicated.

As I explained before, if someone commits a crime of violence, and then is facing sentence for another crime later, their sentence can be significantly increased because of that prior violent crime.

The discussion in my prior post about what counts as a crime of violence is important for understanding the recent Sixth Circuit ruling in United States v. McMurray.