Articles Tagged with “Grand Jury”

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The big news in this batch of opinions is not the conspiracy to import lobsters case, but, rather the Barry Bonds appeal.

Mr. Bonds was prosecuted for evading a prosecutor’s questions while testifying in a grand jury. And, now, thanks to an en banc panel of the Ninth Circuit, his conviction was reversed because giving a nonresponsive answer is not a crime. Though just about any teenager could tell you that.

To the victories:

you win.jpg1. United States v. Bengis, Second Circuit: Appellants were convicted of conspiracy to import lobsters from South African waters in violation of both South African and U.S. law. The district court imposed a restitution order, holding each of the Appellants jointly and severally liable for the market value of all of the lobsters harvested. The Second Circuit reversed the order as to one of the Appellants, who had joined the conspiracy later than the others. The court held that the Appellant was only liable for the value of lobsters taken before he joined the conspiracy if he knew, or reasonably should have known, about the conspiracy’s past imports. The court remanded for the district court to make this determination.

2. United States v. Sandidge, Seventh Circuit: After Appellant pled guilty to being a felon in possession of a firearm, the sentencing court imposed several standard and special conditions of supervised release. The Seventh Circuit vacated all of these conditions because the sentencing court offered no explanation as to their propriety, and conducted no review of the statutory sentencing factors. The court noted that several of the conditions were too vague, including requirements that Appellant meet “family responsibilities” and “not associate with any persons engaged in criminal activity.” The court also noted that several conditions were broader than necessary, such as a requirement not to “consume . . . any mood-altering substances.” The court remanded for resentencing on the issue of conditions of supervised release.

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It’s exceptionally rare for the Fourth Circuit to reverse a life sentence for someone who caused another person to die in the course of a botched bank robbery. And when the panel that heard the appeal has both Judges Wilkinson, and Niemeyer – whoa nelly – that’s one whopper of a government error.

1097248_guard_with_machine_gun.jpgA Bank Robbery Gone Bad

September 28, 2008 did not turn out the way Larry Whitfield had planned.