Articles Tagged with “DC Circuit”

Published on:

It’s a scattershot collection of sentencing remands in this week’s short wins.

Also, Happy Belated President’s Day everyone, or, as OPM says, happy Washington’s Birthday:

This holiday is designated as “Washington’s Birthday” in section 6103(a) of title 5 of the United States Code, which is the law that specifies holidays for Federal employees. Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is our policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.

Published on:

It’s been a big week for resentencings – especially in the Sixth and Seventh Circuits.

The DC Circuit came in with an important decision on the BOP’s Inmate Financial Responsibility Program. The Ninth Circuit weighed in on supervised release conditions in a sex case.

Though, really, six opinions from our federal circuits last week and all of them involve a resentencing. It’s a sad kind of winning.

Published on:

Gregory Fair was an internet entrepreneur. Of sorts.

Mr. Fair’s Criminal Copyright Enterprise

He sold pirated copies of outdated Adobe software on Ebay. His customers could buy this outdated software, then, with an update code Mr. Fair was also able to provide, they could pay Adobe to upgrade their software to the most current version.

Published on:

It’s a good week for reversals in fraud cases.

The Second Circuit sent two fraud cases back for resentencing, and vacated a conviction in its entirety! And they’re cool issues — for example, for the “mass marketing” enhancement under the fraud guidelines to apply, the government has to show not just that mass marketing happened, but that mass marketing happened to victims. A number of convictions were also vacated in a criminal tax prosecution, and the Second Circuit found a violation of the defendant’s public trial right.

The D.C. Circuit entered the fraud remand fray, sending a criminal copyright case back because of errors in the restitution order.

Published on:

Pretty much every federal district judge in the country knows by now that the sentencing guidelines are not mandatory, the guidelines can’t be presumed to be accurate, and that federal district court judges have authority to impose a sentence above, below, or within the sentencing guidelines, applying the factors set out in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a).

1268685_washington_monument.jpgAnd so just about every federal district judge knows that if he or she says she’s going to give a guidelines sentence, he or she has to also say it’s the sentence that they’d give under § 3553(a).

It’s odd, but in federal court it’s very important that a judge knows what power he has, which is exemplified in the D.C. Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Terrell. If a district judge is going to give a guidelines sentence, he or she has to be clear about whether a lower sentence is even possible.

Published on:

The D.C. Circuit, normally an infrequent presence on this blog, has two cases in one week!

One involves Osama bin Laden’s driver and his happy adventures with retroactivity. The was a remand for a judge who thought that a below guidelines sentence is only appropriate when there are “compelling reasons” to go below the guidelines range.

There’s also go action in a Sixth Circuit meth case involving the Fourth Amendment, and a crime of violence case out of the Tenth Circuit.

Published on:

The war on terror[ism] is a massive new problem for society. And, of course, when there’s a massive new problem for society, that ends up being a massive new problem for lawyers.

Despite the debate about whether or not to close the detention facility in Guantanamo Bay – both between Obama when he was a candidate and as President, and in society at large – and the discussion about whether to have civilian or military trials for alleged terrorism suspects, a very real part of the war on terror[ism] has been playing out in our federal courts.

The D.C. Circuit’s opinion from last week in United States v. Mohammed is a nice example.

Published on:

It’s very fashionable these days for United States Attorney’s Offices to bring large indictments charging many people with involvement in a drug conspiracy.

They almost always get convictions.

381260_conspiracy.jpgYet in the case of United States v. Gaskins, the D.C. Circuit – in an opinion written by a former federal prosecutor – ruled that the United States Attorney’s Office indicted, and a jury convicted, a man for being a part of a drug conspiracy when no reasonable juror could have found that he was involved.

Published on:

Jesus Rodriguez took a long time coming to the truth. But in his appeal in United States v. Rodriguez, the D.C. Circuit held that, sometimes, coming to the truth late is coming soon enough.

Mr. Rodriguez was indicted for cocaine distribution. He faced a five-year mandatory minimum.

There Are Two Ways To Get Under A Mandatory Minimum Sentence

Published on:

If you want to read about a large number of issues in federal criminal law in one place, you should check out United States v. Moore. Beach reading it isn’t.

From whether a person on trial can be forced to wear a stun belt during trial, to a discussion of race-based strikes to members of the jury, to testimony about religious conversions and ineffective assistance of counsel, this 128-page beast of an opinion has everything.

There’s even an 11 page concurring opinion on race-based jury strikes!

Contact Information