Articles Tagged with “Illegal Reentry”

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In this set of short wins, the one that I’d like to call attention to is United States v. Cuti.

Restitution is not a sexy issue. It isn’t as fun to read about as, say, a Brady fight, or a glaring evidentiary problem at a trial. But it’s important.

Restitution judgments can be massive and, frankly, too many lawyers, judges, and prosecutors phone it in around restitution. United States v. Cuti clarifies that what counts as restitution is not just any money that any person may have spent as a result of the criminal conduct at the heart of the case. If you’ve got a restitution issue coming up, give it a read. Nice stuff.

To the victories!

you win.jpg1. United States v. Cuti.pdf, Second Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiracy to make false statements and securities fraud. His sentence included an award of restitution under the Victims and Witnesses Protection Act. The Second Circuit held that legal expenses incurred in connection with a civil arbitration connected to the offense are not deemed “necessary” under the VWPA because they were not undertaken or pursued in aid of the prosecution. In addition, the court held that non-victims are eligible for restitution only to the extent such payments were made on behalf of the victim, and remanded for reconsideration of the restitution order.

Defense Attorneys: Brian C. Brook and Matthew J. Peed
2. United States v. Price, Fourth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to failing to register as a sex offender and the district court adopted Guidelines based on the fact that such an offense qualified as a ‘sex offense’. That interpretation was wrong; failing to register as a sex offender does not qualify as a sex offense. The court therefore remanded for resentencing under different sentencing guidelines.

Defense Attorneys: Kimberly Harvey Albro and John H. Hare

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There are two cases in this batch of short wins that I think deserve a special shout out.

First, there’s United States v. Torres-Perez. Appeal waivers are the bane of federal criminal practice (or one of them). Their only advantage is that they make prosecutors’ lives easier. The downside, which is significant, is that they discourage the development of the law. I’d rather have the government work more and know what the law is. Though I may be crazy. In Perez, the Fifth Circuit slapped down an appeal waiver requirement in order to get credit for a acceptance.

Second, there’s United States v. Barta – another great entrapment case from the Seventh Circuit. That circuit is bustin out entrapment cases like Taylor Swift and Katy Perry bust out insults of each other. Or something.

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And, after a really long break, we’re back. Apologies. This day job has been very busy lately.

And, of course, if you ever find yourself jonesing for my writing, you can always check out my stuff on Above the Law.

You saw our guest post on Hite last week – it’s a great case that bears a close read.

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Remember back with this blog was more than just Short Wins? Remember when there were long and loving descriptions of cases?

I still aspire to get back to that vision for the blog – that was fun. Seriously, look for more long write-ups soon. I’ve been distracted by writing for Above the Law (here is a link to my columns (I particularly like the one about cannibalism)) and my day job as a practicing lawyer.

But, if you’re jonesing for those long write-ups again, thanks to the good people at James Publishing, you can now read them in one handy-dandy book. It has the jazzy title Criminal Defense Victories in the Federal Circuits. Or you could just read the archives.

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It’s a relatively slow week in the federal circuits.

My favorite case of the last week is United States v. Torres Pimental. You’ve got to love a suppression motion being granted off of a government delay in presentment.

To the victories!

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There’s been a lot in the circuits in the last week, but perhaps the most surprising bit is that the Seventh Circuit issued four opinions on supervised release conditions.

Supervised release may not be the sexiest of issues, but, especially in child pornography cases, it matters a lot. I’m not sure what’s in the water in Chicago, but whatever it is reaffirms that these conditions need to be narrowly tailored and properly justified.

To the victories!

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It’s generally a slow time of year between Christmas and New Year’s, but the federal circuits have been busy. But who wouldn’t want to start the year with a remand in a criminal case (other than the government)?

Since we were off last week, here are the wins from the last two weeks in the federal circuits.

Happy New Year!

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I’m writing this from the Fourth Circuit Judicial Conference. Here’s my brief recap.

Today, Brian Stevenson, a tremendously cool death penalty lawyer told the assembled group that justice for poor folks and people of color is going to be more likely if decision makers are in closer proximity to poor folks and people of color.

Yesterday, there was a talk about how to improve your home security, to keep any one who wants to get in proximity to you from doing so.

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The Supreme Court has said that you can never suppress the body of a person accused of a crime – the person’s identity is not able to be kept out of evidence, even if that identity is the result of an unlawful arrest or search.

This is a huge issue in illegal reentry cases. If a person is deported then returns to this crime, that’s illegal reentry. If the person is deported after having been convicted of certain kinds of felonies – whoa buddy, that’s illegal reentry after having been convicted of an aggravated felony.

In light of the Supreme Court’s rule about how you can’t suppress the body of the person accused, many people who handle illegal reentry cases find them massively depressing. If you can’t suppress the person’s identity, even if the knowledge comes from an unlawful search, then you’ve gutted the Fourth Amendment for people accused of illegal reentry.

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After yesterday’s heady news from the ABA Law Journal (did I mention you can vote for this blog here), I completely neglected to, you know, actually blog. Apologies.

Here are brief treatments of the wins from the week with Thanksgiving in it. Like Thanksgiving leftovers, there’s not a lot here to be tremendously excited about, but, if you’re really into yams and there are yams in the fridge, you’re happy.

To carry the metaphor forward, let’s hope you’re really into sentencing remands.