Articles Tagged with “DC Circuit”

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And, after a really long break, we’re back. Apologies. This day job has been very busy lately.

And, of course, if you ever find yourself jonesing for my writing, you can always check out my stuff on Above the Law.

You saw our guest post on Hite last week – it’s a great case that bears a close read.

To the Victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Barnes, First Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to distribution and conspiracy to distribute 50kg of marijuana. At sentencing, the district court attributed 3,000kg of marijuana to Appellant after a judicial finding of that quantity by a preponderance of the evidence. After Alleyne, drug quantities must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The First Circuit held that this error was harmful because the government did not provide an explanation that proved, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the error in attributing a larger quantity of drugs did not “contribute” to the complained-about sentence, and therefore vacated the sentence.

Defense Attorney: Judith H. Mizner
2. United States v. Prange, First Circuit: The trial court erred in calculating the loss amount attributable to Appellants when it relied on the PSR, which recommended loss amounts unsupported by law. Appellants were entitled to have the loss amount lowered when the stocks they sold had some value when it was sold. The cases were remanded so the district court could make factual findings as to the value of the shares acquired by the government during the sting.

Defense Attorneys: Steven N. Fuller, Allen Fuller, and Inga L. Parsons
3. United States v. Sevilla-Oyola, First Circuit: After an initial plea hearing and sentencing, Appellant filed a motion challenging his sentence. A number of hearings were held after, during which the trial court lowered the sentence each time. The trial court, however, did not have authority for his actions during a majority of the proceedings. The variety of motions filed by Appellant could not be considered a Section 2255 motion because Appellants only gets one complete round of collateral review and none of the parties had considered Appellant’s motions to be a habeas petition. All of the convictions were vacated and remanded for one final resentencing.

Defense Attorney: Rafael F. Castro Lang
4. United States v. Starks, First Circuit: Appellant was convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm after a police officer stopped him in a car his son had rented. The district court held that Appellant did not have standing to challenge the stop because Appellant was not the authorized driver of the rental car. But because a mere passenger in a car has standing to challenge the constitutionality of the stop, the First Circuit held that Appellant’s status as an unlicensed, unauthorized driver was no less than that of a passenger and therefore he had standing. This required the conviction to be vacated and remanded for an evidentiary hearing.

Defense Attorney: James L. Sultan
5. United States v. Zhyltsou, Second Circuit: A jury found Appellant guilty of the unlawful transfer of a false identification document. During trial, the court admitted as evidence a printed copy of a social media webpage which the government claimed was created by Appellant. The government did not satisfy the authentication requirement because it did not prove that it was Appellant’s profile page rather than a page on the internet that was about Appellant but which Appellant did not create or control. The conviction was vacated and the case remanded.

Defense Attorney: Yuanchung Lee
6. United States v. Bui, Third Circuit: Appellant’s petition for habeas corpus should have been granted because he received ineffective assistance of counsel. Appellant pled guilty only after his trial counsel provided him with incorrect advice regarding the availability of a sentencing reduction pursuant to the “safety valve.” Although trial counsel filed a motion for such a reduction, he withdrew it after realizing Appellant was ineligible. This amounted to ineffective assistance of counsel.

Defense Attorneys: Maria K. Pulzetti and Brett G. Sweitzer
7. United States v. Paladino, Third Circuit: Appellant challenged the district court’s judgment revoking Appellant’s supervised release and imposing a prison sentence. The judgment was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing because Appellant was denied the right to allocute at sentencing when the court did not address Appellant personally or permit him to speak or present information in mitigation of the sentence.

Defense Attorney: Sarah S. Gannett
8. United States v. Catone, Fourth Circuit: A jury convicted Appellant of one count of making a false statement in connection with his receipt of federal workers’ compensation benefits and was sentenced to 16 months’ imprisonment and to pay $106,411.83 in restitution. The sentence must be vacated because the jury did not make a finding that the offense led to more than $1,000 in falsely obtained benefits, so Appellant could only be given a maximum 12-month, misdemeanor sentence. The loss calculation was wrong because it should have reflected the difference between the amount of benefits that he actually received and the amount that he would have received but for the false statement. Instead, restitution was vacated because the loss amount was calculated as the full amount Appellant had received in workers’ compensation during that time period.

Defense Attorneys: Joshua B. Carpenter and Ross Hall Richardson
9. United States v. Randall, Fifth Circuit: Although Appellant pled guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, the factual basis on which his plea was based and the PSR found that Appellant was only responsible for less than 200 grams of cocaine. Appellant’s sentence, which was based on his liability for five kilograms of cocaine, was vacated and remanded because Appellant should be sentenced based only on the facts adopted by the court–that is, the amount attributable only to him and not to the conspiracy as a whole–and that amount did not require a mandatory minimum sentence.

10. United States v. Snelling, Sixth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, obstruction of justice, and tax evasion and sentenced to 131 months in prison. In determining the sentencing guidelines range, the court failed to take into account sums paid back to the Ponzi scheme’s investors in the course of the fraud. This resulted in a higher loss value, and therefore a larger sentencing enhancement. The sentence was therefore vacated and remanded for recalculation.

Defense Attorney: Kevin M. Schad
11. Swisher v. Porter Co Sheriff’s Dept., Seventh Circuit: Appellant brought a §1983 complaint based on a pretrial denial of medical care for a bullet wound to his abdomen. Appellant had not exhausted all administrative remedies, so the district court dismissed his complaint. The denial was reversed because Appellant had not been advised of the grievance procedure and was told by the Warden not to file a grievance.

12. United States v. Bowling, Seventh Circuit: Appellants convictions for making false statements in connection with the purchase of a firearm were reversed and the case remanded for a new trial. The Seventh Circuit held that Appellant had to be given the opportunity to present a mistake of fact defense because, although he was charged with a felony at the time, he was also aware that the plea deal offered was for a misdemeanor. The Court held that Appellant should not have to testify in order to present the defense, but instead can cross-examine other witnesses.

13. United States v. Hinds, Seventh Circuit: Appellant’s case was remanded for resentencing because the district court improperly imposed two special conditions of supervised release. The condition requiring Appellant to pay for a portion of his court-ordered substance abuse treatment and drug testing was in error because the district court expressly found that Appellant lacked the ability to pay the interest requirement on the restitution and the court did not order a fine based on the same inability to pay. And the condition requiring Appellant to submit to suspicionless searches and seizures was also in error, and the government conceded at oral argument that this invasive condition has already been banned by the court.

14. United States v. Myers, Seventh Circuit: Appellant was convicted of several identity theft-related crimes and sentenced to 132 months imprisonment. The sentence was vacated because the six-level enhancement for 250 or more victims violated the Ex Post Facto Clause. The guidelines in place at the time of the crime would not have characterized many of the individuals as victims.

15. United States v. Reid, Eighth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of unlawful possession of a firearm by a felon, which carries a ten year maximum sentence. The court found that Appellant’s prior conviction qualified him under the Armed Career Criminal Act to a guidelines range of fifteen years to life imprisonment. Because Appellant’s prior conviction was not a violent felony, as required by the Armed Career Criminal Act, his sentence was vacated.

16. Deck v. Jenkins, Ninth Circuit: Petitioner’s writ of habeas corpus should have been granted where the prosecutor, in closing argument, negated an essential element of the intent to commit a lewd act upon a child. The prosecutor argued that the intent element could be proven if Petitioner intended to commit the act not on the day of his arrest, but at some point in the future. This prosecutorial error was not harmless where the jury was confused, a corrective instruction was not given, and the written jury instructions did not address the subject of the jury’s confusion.

Defense Attorney: Charles M. Sevilla
17. Sessoms v. Grounds, Ninth Circuit: Petitioner’s writ of habeas corpus should have been granted because a reasonable law enforcement officer should have understood Petitioner’s statements as an unambiguous request for counsel. In light of Salinas v. Texas, the requirement of an unambiguous invocation of the right to counsel applied to pre-Miranda statements like Petitioner’s.

Defense Attorney: Eric Weaver
18. United States v. Aguilera-Rios, Ninth Circuit: Petitioner’s conviction for illegal reentry was reversed because his prior removal order was invalid. The removal order was based on a conviction for unlawful possession of a firearm. The statute criminalizing that conduct did not have an antique firearms exception and therefore was not a categorical match for the Immigration and Nationality Act’s firearm offense. Since there was no categorical match, the removal order was invalid.

Defense Attorney: Kara Hartzler
19. United States v. Bell, Ninth Circuit: After being convicted of making false, fictitious, and fraudulent claims to the US treasury, filing false tax returns, contempt, and mail fraud, Appellant was sentenced and, as part of supervised release, required to undergo substance abuse treatment and abstain from consuming alcohol. That condition was vacated and the case remanded because the record contained no evidence showing that Appellant abused any substance.

Defense Attorney: Gregory Charles Link
20. United States v. Brown, Ninth Circuit: A case arising from a Ponzi scheme and bankruptcy fraud was remanded for resentencing. The sentencing court erroneously imposed an enhancement for endangering the solvency or financial security of 100 or more victims where the government did not provide evidence of the impact of the crimes on the requisite number of victims. In addition, Appellant Eddings’ sentence also included an erroneous leadership role adjustment because the trial court noted that it wasn’t clear whether Eddings controlled a particular participant, and the record does not indicate that he controlled any other criminally responsible participant in the scheme. Further, it was error to apply a sentencing enhancement for having 250 or more victims when the district court relied on 148 victims who were not included in the loss calculation.

Defense Attorneys: Heather Williams, David M. Porter, Rachelle Barbour, and John Balazs
21. United States v. Bryant, Ninth Circuit: Appellant moved to dismiss the indictment charging him with two counts of domestic assault by a habitual offender. Appellant was previously convicted in tribal court of domestic abuse, which the government used to establish the element of a prior offense. The Court held that only tribal court convictions obtained when Appellant had a right to counsel which is, at a minimum, coextensive with the Sixth Amendment right to counsel, can be used in a subsequent prosecution. Because Appellant did not have such a right to counsel during his tribal court convictions, they could not be used against him in this case and the indictment should have been dismissed.

Defense Attorneys: Steve C. Babcock and Anthony R. Gallagher
22. United States v. Castro-Ponce, Ninth Circuit: Appellant’s sentence enhancement for obstruction of justice was vacated because the trial court did not explicitly find that Appellant’s false testimony was also willful and material.

Defense Attorney: Lynn T. Hamilton
23. United States v. Heredia, Ninth Circuit: The government made repeated and inflammatory references to Appellant’s criminal history throughout its sentencing memorandum. Because those references served no practical purpose but to argue implicitly for a higher punishment than it had agreed to recommend, Appellant’s sentence was vacated and remanded.

Defense Attorneys: Sean K. Kennedy and Jonathan D. Libby
24. United States v. Hernandez, Ninth Circuit: As part of Appellant’s sentence for illegal reentry, the district court added a sentencing enhancement for Appellant’s prior conviction of being a felon in possession of a firearm under the California Penal Code. Because that statute does not include an antique-firearm exception, it is not a categorical match for the federal firearms offense. Therefore the enhancement was improper and the case was remanded for resentencing.

Defense Attorneys: Sean K. Kennedy and James H. Locklin
25. United States v. Mavromatis, Ninth Circuit: Appellant’s conviction for being in possession of a firearm after being committed to a mental institution. This conviction was barred by double jeopardy because Appellant was previously acquitted on a charge based on the same incident of possession.

Defense Attorneys: Rich Curtner and Noa Oren
26. United States v. Melot, Tenth Circuit: Appellants were held in contempt and sanctions imposed after the district court believed the Appellants fraudulently intervened in the foreclosure of their properties. The sanctions were reversed because Appellants only had notice that the court was considering contempt. The lack of notice of sanctions or the opportunity to be heard was a denial of due process in violation of the Fifth Amendment.

Katherine L. Melot and Billy R. Melot proceeded pro se.

27. United States v. Reyes Vera, Ninth Circuit: Appellants were convicted of a drug conspiracy and the use of a minor to commit a drug trafficking offense. During trial, a police officer was called as an expert to explain the drug jargon used in wiretapped phone calls. The Ninth Circuit held that this testimony was a mix of lay and expert opinion, and the trial court’s failure to explain that distinction to the jury was in error. Because this error affected the drug quantities found by the jury in a special verdict (which itself impacted the mandatory minimum sentences), the case was remanded for proper determination of drug quantity.

Defense Attorneys: Gretchen Fusilier and Thomas Paul Slesinger
28. Williams v. Swarthout, Ninth Circuit: Petitioner’s writ of habeas corpus should have been granted where the trial court made a misstatement immediately before trial that Petitioner had pled guilty, and that misstatement was not corrected until the jury began to deliberate. This deprived Petitioner of the presumption of innocence and violated his Sixth Amendment right to an impartial jury because the error was not rendered harmless by curative instructions.

Defense Attorneys: William J. Capriola and John P. Ward
29. United States v. Bear, Tenth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to failing to register or update a registration as a sex offender. The special condition of supervised release restricting Appellant’s contact with his children was reversed. Any condition that interferes with the right of familial association can do so only in compelling circumstances, and here the government did not present evidence that Appellant displayed a propensity to commit future sexual offenses or exhibited any proclivity toward sexual violence, nor has he shown any display of danger to his own children.

Defense Attorney: Brooke A. Tebow
30. United States v. Powell, Tenth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of numerous counts related to making, uttering, or possessing a forged security after he altered payee information or forged endorsements and then deposited checks stolen from the United States mail into his bank accounts at various banks. That crime requires the government to prove that the security (including checks) belonged to an organization (such as a bank). His convictions were vacated because proof that the checks were deposited into a federally insured bank was not proof that the checks were “of” the depository banks.

Defense Attorney: Ty Gee
31. United States v. Hite, DC Circuit: Appellant’s conviction for attempting to persuade a minor to engage in unlawful sexual activity was vacated. Although it is not necessary for the communication to be directly to a minor, the government must prove that the communications with an intermediary are aimed at persuading, inducing, enticing, or coercing the minor. The jury instructions did not reflect such an understanding and require Appellant’s conviction to be vacated. In addition, Appellant should have been permitted to introduce expert evidence about Appellant’s lack of sexual interest in children since that question is relevant to proving intent.

Defense Attorneys: Lawrence S. Robbins, Barry J. Pollack, A.J. Kramer, Jonathan Jeffress, and Rosanna M. Taormina

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Remember back with this blog was more than just Short Wins? Remember when there were long and loving descriptions of cases?

I still aspire to get back to that vision for the blog – that was fun. Seriously, look for more long write-ups soon. I’ve been distracted by writing for Above the Law (here is a link to my columns (I particularly like the one about cannibalism)) and my day job as a practicing lawyer.

But, if you’re jonesing for those long write-ups again, thanks to the good people at James Publishing, you can now read them in one handy-dandy book. It has the jazzy title Criminal Defense Victories in the Federal Circuits. Or you could just read the archives.

In other self-promoting news, the ABA’s annual list of best blogs is open for nominations. Here’s the link. It would be nice if you’d say something nice about this blog, but don’t feel like you have to.

To the Victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Flores-Mejia, Third Circuit: The court vacated Appellant’s sentence after being convicted of reentry after deportation. The Third Circuit, however, used the opportunity to change its current law and now requires a party to object to procedural errors during the sentencing proceeding once that error is evident, otherwise it is not preserved. Because the new rule cannot apply retroactively, Appellant’s case was remanded.

Defense Attorney: Robert Epstein
2. Hurst v. Joyner, Fourth Circuit: The district court improperly denied a petition for habeas corpus. The Fourth Circuit remanded for an evidentiary hearing where a juror communicated with her father during the penalty phase of Appellant’s capital murder trial. At her father’s suggestion, the juror read a section in the Bible about “an eye for an eye,” and then voted in favor of the death penalty the following day. An evidentiary hearing was necessary to determine whether that communication had a substantial and injurious effect or influence on the jury’s verdict.

Defense Attorney: Robert Hood Hale
3. United States v. Garrett, Sixth Circuit: Appellant was sentenced to 151 months’ imprisonment after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute more than 50 grams of crack cocaine. Although that sentence was at the bottom of Appellant’s guidelines, the Sixth Circuit determined that Appellant was eligible for resentencing because his sentence was based on a sentencing range that has subsequently been lowered by the Sentencing Commission. Appellant’s initial Guidelines range was 151 to 188 months, but after the Guidelines Amendment, it would be 120 to 137 months.

Defense Attorneys: Bradley R. Hall and James Gerometta
4. Townsend v. Cooper, Seventh Circuit: Appellant sued a number of officials at his correctional facility and the district court granted summary judgment in favor of the Appellees. The court determined, taken in the light most favorable to Appellant, that Appellant raised genuine issues of material fact about whether he had a liberty interest in avoiding transfer to more restrictive prison conditions, which would require procedural due process. Because there was not appropriate notice or an opportunity to be heard, the district court’s grant of summary judgment was vacated and remanded.

5. United States v. Harden, Seventh Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to possession with intent to distribute cocaine and Appellant agreed to allow a magistrate judge perform he plea colloquy. Taking and accepting guilty pleas in felony cases is not one of the enumerated duties of magistrate judges and was determined by the Seventh Circuit to be both important and dispositive. Therefore, magistrate judges are not authorized to accept guilty pleas in felony cases, even if both parties would consent.

6. United States v. Sheth, Seventh Circuit: After pleading guilty to health care fraud, the district court entered an order of criminal forfeiture for cash and investment accounts then valued at about $13 million plus real estate and a vehicle. The forfeited assets would be credited against his $12,376,310 restitution. The government then sought further assets to apply to restitution and the district court ordered Appellant to turn over those assets. The turnover order was vacated and remanded for discovery and an evidentiary hearing to determine whether the first set of forfeited assets was sufficient to cover the restitution order.

7. United States v. Doering, Eighth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to tampering with evidence and was sentenced to 90 months’ imprisonment and ordered to pay $45,382.88 in restitution. The restitution order was vacated and remanded because Appellant’s plea agreement did not list, as required, that an offense listed in the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act gave rise to the plea agreement. Without that specific, mandatory term, restitution under the MVRA was unauthorized.

8. United States v. Howard, Eighth Circuit: The order of restitution against Appellant was vacated because the calculation improperly included losses from dates preceding the relevant conduct of Appellant’s extortion conviction. The losses arose outsides of the dates listed in the indictment.

9. United States v. Nguyen, Eighth Circuit: Appellant’s conviction for knowingly shipping, transporting, receiving, possessing, selling, and distributing contraband cigarettes was reversed because there was insufficient evidence. Specifically, the government had no evidence that Appellant was aware of any applicable sales taxes on the cigarettes; the government had no evidence as to Appellant’s knowing violation of the statute.

10. United States v. Thomas, Eighth Circuit: Appellants was sentenced to 120 months’ imprisonment after pleading guilty to possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine. The case was remanded because the district court’s oral sentence was ambiguous about the sentencing guidelines range on which the Appellant’s sentence as based. On appeal, that ambiguity made it impossible to determine if the district court committed procedural error.

11. United States v. Gonzalez, Ninth Circuit: The Ninth Circuit remanded Petitioner’s case with instructions to grant the writ of habeas corpus based on the prosecution’s failure to disclose Brady material that would have impeached the credibility of a critical witness. The California Court of Appeal’s decision that Petitioner had not established that the evidence was newly discovered was an unreasonable determination of the facts. The court held that the California Court of Appeal’s requirement of due diligence was contrary to, or involved an unreasonable application of, clearly established federal law.

Defense Attorney: John Lanahan
12. Wood v. Ryan, Ninth Circuit: The district court improperly denied Appellant’s request for a preliminary injunction delaying his execution, which was scheduled for July 23, 2014. Appellant presented claimed that Department of Corrections violated his First Amendment rights by denying him information regarding the method of his execution. Because Appellant presented serious questions to the merits of the claim, and because the balance of hardships tips in his favor, the preliminary injunction should have been granted
13. United States v. Charles, Eleventh Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to charges relating to a conspiring to use unauthorized access devices. Appellant’s sentence was vacated because the district court committed legal error when it included a two-level sentence increase for trafficking in unauthorized access devices (for example, a prepaid debit card). Because Appellant was convicted of aggravated identity theft as well, the district court was precluded from considering any specific offense characteristic for the transfer, possession, or use of a means of identification when determining the sentence for the underlying offense.

14. United States v. Estrella, Eleventh Circuit: As part of his sentence for illegal reentry, Appellant’s received a sentencing enhancement for a crime of violence based on his prior conviction for wantonly or maliciously throwing, hurling, or projecting a missile, stone, or other hard substance at an occupied vehicle. Under the categorical approach, the Eleventh Circuit determined that a conviction for that crime does not necessarily involve proof of the use, attempt, or threat of force. Therefore, the crime of violence enhancement was improper.

15. Bahlul v. United States, D.C. Circuit: Hamdan II held that there cannot be retroactive prosecution for conduct committed before the Military Commissions Act of 2006 unless that conduct was already prohibited under existing U.S. law as a war crime triable by a military commission. But that understand was contrary to the statutory wording, which allowed for the prosecution of any crimes. The D.C. Circuit, applying an ex post facto analysis, determined that Appellant’s conviction for providing material support for terrorism and solicitation of others to commit war crimes were not previously offenses that were triable by a military commission, so the convictions were vacated.

Defense Attorneys: Michel Paradis, Mary R. McCormick, and Todd E. Pierce

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Last week was a busy week in the federal circuits. There’s a lot there to be interested in, especially if you have a case at the intersection of mental health issues and the law.

If, however, your interests are a bit more prosaic, you might want to read United States v. Ward. There, the person accused was convicted of defrauding different people than the indictment alleged he defrauded.

Amazing stuff.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. Davis v. Humphreys, Seventh Circuit: The Seventh Circuit indicated that mental incompetence can justify tolling the statute of limitations for a motion under 28 U.S.C. §2244 in certain situations. Because the district court did not conduct proper fact finding to determine Appellant’s mental limitations here, the Court chose to remand and did not yet articulate the standard it will use in these situations.

2. United States v. DeBenedetto, Seventh Circuit: The district court’s commitment order was vacated and the case remanded for further proceedings because the hearing and written findings were inadequate. To require a person to undergo involuntary mental health treatment, there are four findings that the district court must make, but failed to do so. On remand, the district court is required to make explicit findings about each of the factors.

3. United States v. Long, Seventh Circuit: One Appellant must be resentenced under the Fair Sentencing Act, which is applicable to any person sentenced after the Act was enacted, regardless of when the underlying conduct occurred. The district court had applied the pre-FSA mandatory minimum based on findings which would not be enough under the Fair Sentencing Act.

4. United States v. Burrage, Eighth Circuit: On remand from the Supreme Court, the Eighth Circuit reversed Appellant’s conviction for one count – the distribution of heroin resulting in death – based on improper jury instructions. The case was remanded to the district court to enter a conviction for the lesser-included offense of distribution of heroin because the evidence was insufficient to support a conviction for distribution resulting in death.

5. United States v. Emly, Eighth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of one count of receipt of materials involving sexual exploitation of children and three counts of possession of materials involving the sexual exploitation of children. The three possession counts are multiplicitous – the possession of copies of several different files on separate devices constitutes only a single violation. The case was remanded with instructions to vacate all but one of the possession charges.

6. Albino v. Baca: The Court held that the appropriate procedural device for a pretrial determination of whether administrative remedies have been exhausted under the Prisoner Litigation Reform Act is a motion for summary judgment. Summary judgment should have been granted for Appellant because he satisfied the exhaustion requirement because no administrative remedies were available at the jail where Appellant was confined.

Defense Attorney: Andrea Renee St. Julian
7. United States v. IMM, Juvenile Male, Ninth Circuit: Appellant’s conviction for child sex abuse was reversed and remanded because Appellant was not Mirandized and was in custody when he made inculpatory statements. This violation of Appellant’s Fifth Amendment requires suppression of the statements.

Defense Attorney: Jill E. Thorpe
8. United States v. Ward, Ninth Circuit: Appellant’s convictions for two counts of aggravated identity theft were reversed. The district court improperly allowed the jury to convict Appellant of stealing identities of victims who were not the specific victims named in the indictment.

Defense Attorney: Davina T. Chen
9. United States v. Feliciano, Eleventh Circuit: Appellant was convicted of bank robbery charges and use of a firearm. There was insufficient evidence of one gun charge. The evidence was that an accomplice never saw Appellant with a gun and knew Appellant did not have a gun at one robbery. This required reversal of the conviction.

10. United States v. Grzybowicz, Eleventh Circuit: Appellant’s conviction for distribution of child pornography. The court determined that distribution required delivery or transfer to another person and Appellant had only emailed images to himself. Because the evidence was insufficient to convict Appellant on this charge, the conviction was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

11. United States v. Clark, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of bank and wire fraud. The district court applied Sentencing Guidelines, which were not published until after the crimes. This retroactive application violated the Ex Post Facto Clause and required remand for resentencing.

Defense Attorneys: Jessica L. Ellsworth, Peter S. Spivack, and Matthew J. Iaconetti

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The big news in this edition of Short Wins is United States v. Abair – a simply crazy Seventh Circuit.

I already wrote about it for a general legal audience on Above the Law (Inspector Javert Goes Smurfing in Indiana) – for our purposes, the legal issue is whether she was appropriately crossed on statements in her tax returns or student loan applications.

I had a case years ago where the AUSA and I litigated whether he could use similar statements in cross if my client testified. We lost. Happily, we weren’t able to appeal the decision, but it’s freakin’ insane the way this stuff comes in sometimes. Abair is a nice step in moving the law in the right way.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Diaz-Rodriguez, First Circuit: Appellant was convicted at trial of aiding and abetting interference with commerce by threats of violence and one count of using a firearm during the commission of a crime of violence. Those convictions were vacated because Appellant was denied his Sixth Amendment Right to Counsel when it forbade him from retaining new counsel during trial without inquiring into his conflict with his present counsel.

Defense Attorney: Rafael F. Castro Lang
2. United States v. Abair, Seventh Circuit: During Appellant’s trial for structuring financial transactions in order to evade federal reporting requirements, the prosecutor cross-examined Appellant about alleged false statements on a tax return and student financial aid applications. Because the government lacked a good faith basis for believing Appellant had lied on those documents, the Seventh Circuit reversed the conviction and remanded for a new trial. The Seventh Circuit determined that the information elicited during that cross-examination was prejudicial and harmful error.

3. United States v. Cabrera-Gutierrez, Ninth Circuit: The Court withdrew its June 3, 2013 Opinion and filed this Amended Opinion. The Court held that the district court erred in sentencing Appellant as a Tier III sex offender based on a prior conviction under an Oregon statute. The district court improperly applied the categorical approach to determine how that prior conviction would impact Appellant’s sentencing enhancement, so Appellant’s sentence was vacated.

Defense Attorney: Rebecca L. Pennell
4. United States v. Cortes, Ninth Circuit: Appellant was tried for drug conspiracy charges after he was arrested during an undercover reverse sting operation. The conviction was reversed because the district court gave the jury an improper jury instruction on an entrapment defense. In giving the jury instruction, the district court erred in excluding that drugs or any profit from the sale of drugs could be a basis for inducement.

Defense Attorney: Gary P. Burcham
5. United States v. Montes-Ruiz, Ninth Circuit: The district court erred in sentencing Appellant by ordering a sentence which was to run consecutively to an anticipated, but not-yet-imposed, federal sentence in a separate case. Since it is impermissible to impose a sentence which will run consecutively to a hypothetical sentence, Appellant’s sentence was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

Defense Counsel: Devin Burstein
6. United States v. Peyton, D.C. Circuit: The trial court admitted evidence gathered from Appellant’s apartment as a part of two separate warrantless searches. Because the first warrantless search was not lawfully permitted, the convictions were vacated and remanded.

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Happy Monday!

We have three short but good cases from the circuits from last week. I think my favorite is U.S. v. Glover, a nice suppression case. Congrats to Adam Kurland for the win.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. Huff v. U.S., Sixth Circuit: Appellant entered a plea agreement, pleading guilty to various fraud and identity theft charges. The parties also agreed to use the November 1, 2002 Sentencing Guideline Manual but the court used a later version, resulting in a higher sentencing range. When Appellant first appealed, his attorney talked him into dismissing and the district court rejected Appellant’s ineffective assistance of counsel claim without an evidentiary hearing. The Sixth Circuit reverses and remands because a hearing was necessary to properly evaluate the ineffective assistance of counsel claim.

Defense Attorney: Michael M. Losavio
2. U.S. v. Bruguier, Eighth Circuit: After a jury trial, Appellant was convicted of sexual abuse, burglary, aggravated sexual abuse, and sexual abuse of a minor and sentenced to 360 months imprisonment. Appellant argued that the jury instructions for sexual abuse omitted a mens rea element. Agreeing with Appellant, the Eighth Circuit remanded for a new trial on the sexual abuse count and vacated Appellant’s sentence.

3. U.S. v. Glover, DC Circuit: Glover was convicted of conspiring to possess and distribute cocaine. A warrant was issued in D.C. but allowed the police to place an electronic bug on Glover’s truck which was parked in Maryland. The D.C. Circuit found that this warrant was facially insufficient and the evidence obtained pursuant to it should have been suppressed. Because the district court did not suppress the evidence, the conviction is reversed.

Defense Attorneys: Adam H. Kurland and Robert S. Becker

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Dear Readers,

Apologies for posting so sparsely lately. Between covering the end of the Supreme Court term for Above the Law (see posts here or here if you’d like) and this day job as a lawyer, I’ve been remiss in keeping you up to date on what’s what in the circuits.

Today, please find the Short Wins for the last two weeks. My personal favorite is United States v. Huizar-Velazquez because there simply isn’t enough law on criminal importation of wire hangars.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. In re Sealed Case, D.C. Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine. At the time, he was subject to a 20-year mandatory minimum sentence. He provided substantial assistance to law enforcement, and the government asked the court to sentence appellant below the mandatory minimum. The court did so. Notwithstanding the fact that appellant was sentenced below the mandatory minimum, he was eligible for a sentence reduction under the recent amendments to the Sentencing Guidelines. Therefore, the case was remanded for the district court to consider whether a sentence reduction is warranted.

2. United States v. Cotton, Fifth Circuit: Drugs were seized during a search of appellant’s car during a traffic stop. Because appellant limited his consent to a search of his luggage only – where the drugs were not located – the officer’s prolonged and more extensive search of the entire car violated appellant’s Fourth Amendment right. The drugs should have been suppressed as fruits of the unlawful search. Appellant’s conviction was vacated and the case remanded.

3. United States v. Huizar-Velazquez, Ninth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to importing wire hangers without paying the proper duties. At sentencing, the court applied the wrong sentencing guideline – it should have applied the guideline addressing evasion of import duties by smugglers trying to fool, rather than corrupt, government officials. Similarly, the court calculated the loss amount under the wrong guideline. For these reasons, appellant’s sentence was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

4. United States v. White Eagle, Ninth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of the following offenses, among others: conspiracy to convert tribal credit program proceeds (count I); theft and conversion from an Indian Tribal Organization (count II); concealment of public corruption (count IV); and public acts affecting a personal financial interest (count V). Counts I and II were reversed because the alleged object of the conspiracy – modifying a loan – was not criminal. Therefore, there was no conspiracy. Count IV was reversed because the government did not show that appellant violated a specific duty to report credit program fraud. Count V was reversed because the connection between appellant’s alleged financial interest and a Bureau of Indian Affairs administrative officer’s fraudulent loans was remote and speculative. Further, the court erred at sentencing in calculating the loss amount, requiring remand.

5. Gonzalez v. United States, Second Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to narcotics and bribery crimes and was sentenced to 210 months in prison. The district court denied appellant’s 28 U.S.C. § 2255 motion to vacate his conviction and sentence. In the motion, appellant argued that his attorney provided ineffective assistance in connection with the guilty plea and sentencing. Because appellant demonstrated that the attorney’s ineffective assistance was prejudicial, the district court’s order dismissing appellant’s motion was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing with the assistance of competent counsel.

6. United States v. Nicholson, Tenth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to three drug and weapons-related charges after the district court denied his motion to suppress evidence found in his car after a traffic stop. Because the officer pulled appellant over for making a turn that was not illegal, the officer violated the Fourth Amendment. No other legal basis existed for stopping appellant and the good faith exception did not apply. For these reasons, the denial of appellant’s motion to suppress was reversed and the case remanded with directions to vacate his convictions.

7. United States v. Thompson, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was found guilty of drug charges. Because the record was insufficient to resolve appellant’s claim that his attorney was ineffective in failing to inform him of plea offers from the prosecution before the offers expired, the case was remanded to the district court for whatever proceedings are necessary to determine whether appellant was denied his right to effective assistance of counsel.

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Today’s featured case is United States v. Hampton for a few reasons.

First, it’s from the DC Circuit, and my office is in DC – our Circuit’s pro-defendant decisions are particularly exciting (to me).

Second, it involves law enforcement agents offering expert testimony. Law enforcement testimony is massively frustrating – it feels, at times, that there no bounds to what an FBI Agent will testify about.

Third, it comes out of a retrial. Who doesn’t love a retrial?

Though, I should say, there are plenty of other great cases in this week’s Short Wins.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Buffer, Sixth Circuit: The district court erred in denying appellant’s motion to suppress evidence gathered from a search warrant and arrest because it incorrectly determined that (1) the warrant was supported by probable cause and (2) even if the warrant wasn’t supported by probable cause, the good faith exception to the warrant requirement applied. Because of these errors, the appellate court reversed the order denying appellant’s motion, vacated appellant’s conviction, and remanded for further proceedings.

2. United States v. Davis, Fourth Circuit: Appellant received a consolidated sentence for several state law violations. The court counted the sentence as at least “two prior felony convictions” under the Sentencing Guidelines career offender enhancement provision. Because appellant’s consolidated sentence was a single sentence for purposes of the career offender enhancement, the court vacated appellant’s sentence and remanded for resentencing.

3. United States v. Galpin, Second Circuit: Appellant moved to suppress evidence of child pornography. The court agreed with appellant that the search warrant that led to the discovery of this evidence was overbroad and that the officers lacked probable cause to conduct it. Nevertheless, the court ruled that the warrant was severable and that the images found would have been in plain view during a properly limited search. This ruling was error: because the record as to whether the warrant was severable and whether the images were in plain view was deficient, the trial court’s order denying the motion to suppress was vacated and the case remanded for further proceedings.

4. United States v. Hampton, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of drug conspiracy charges after a mistrial and re-trial. At the re-trial, the district court allowed an FBI agent to give lay-opinion testimony about his understanding of recorded conversations played for the jury. Because the court failed to enforce the boundaries for this type of evidence in Federal Rule of Evidence 701, the court denied the jury the information it needed to assess the agent’s interpretations. Appellant’s conviction was vacated.

5. United States v. Tien, Second Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to bribery of a public official and forgery of a passport at separate conferences held 16 months apart. In both pleas, the court plainly erred when it violated Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 11, which sets forth the requirements the court must follow in determining whether a plea is voluntary. Because the pleas weren’t knowingly and voluntarily entered, both were vacated and the case remanded.

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Three opinions are in this week’s “short wins” – on restitution calculation, competency in a bank robbery case, and the Fair Sentencing Act.

And, in federal public defender budget news, the New York Times had an editorial last week calling for more sensible funding of the government services required by the Constitution. Here’s the best bit:

The right to counsel is already badly battered in state courts, largely because most states grossly underfinance the representation of impoverished defendants. Indigent defense in federal criminal cases has served as an admirable contrast because of the high quality and availability of federal defenders. Now this system is in peril. Federal defenders will not be able to take the time to visit clients in prison or search for facts that could raise doubts about clients’ guilt.

Budget cuts hit every part of the federal government, as we know. Which is why the Department of Justice last week asked to hire an additional 100 lawyers next year over what they had this year.

As the Legal Times reports it,

The U.S. Department of Justice’s budget request for 2014 seeks to add dozens of attorney positions, boosting efforts to combat cybersecurity, prosecute financial and mortgage fraud and combat international piracy of intellectual property.

For those of you keeping score at home, the federal public defender is laying off people – including at least one Federal Public Defender himself – furloughing others, and otherwise scrambling to deal with the 5% budget cut that went into effect in February. Meanwhile, DOJ is staffing up.

Apparently a change in tide does not affect all boats equally.

Should DOJ worry that they won’t find enough harried, underpaid public defenders to be on the other side of the the cases that their fancy new prosecutors will be bringing?

And, with that, to the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1.United States v. Fareri, D.C. Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to mail fraud, was sentenced to 105 months in prison, and ordered to pay restitution. Remand was required for the district court to correct the specific amounts owed to appellant’s victims, as the list of payments due to each victim exceeded the amount identified in the court’s oral pronouncement and written judgment. Though the district court’s total restitution amount was binding, remand was required to reapportion the payments between victims. [Note – Matt Kaiser was trial counsel in this case.]

2. United States v. Grigsby, Sixth Circuit: The district court issued an order allowing the government to medicate appellant, a pretrial detainee diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, in an effort to restore appellant’s mental competency so that he could be prosecuted on bank robbery charges. Because appellant’s liberty interest in avoiding involuntary medication outweighed the government’s interest in prosecution, the order was reversed and the case remanded for further proceedings.

3. United States v. Hinds, Eleventh Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute crack cocaine and sentenced to a lengthy prison term. He was later resentenced to a reduced term of 120 months. The acts giving rise to the conviction occurred before the passage of the Fair Sentencing Act (“FSA”), though appellant was re-sentenced after the Act. The FSA raised the drug quantities required to trigger mandatory minimum sentences for certain crack offenses. Because appellant was re-sentenced after the FSA was enacted, his sentence was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

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It’s a good week in the federal circuits for folks accused of a crime.

Instead of the all-too-common diet of sentencing remands, there are some nice wins on our rights against unreasonable searches and seizures and against uncounseled statements to law enforcement. Well done appellate counsel!

And, what week would be complete without an opinion on restitution in child pornography cases.

To the Victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Black, Fourth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to being a felon in possession of a firearm after his motion to suppress the firearm was denied. Because the officers who stopped him lacked reasonable suspicion to believe he was engaged in a crime, the stop violated the Fourth Amendment, and the firearm should have been suppressed as fruit of the unlawful search. For these reasons, the district court’s ruling on the motion was reversed and appellant’s conviction and sentence were vacated.

2. United States v. Gamble, Sixth Circuit: Appellants were convicted of two unrelated child pornography offenses and ordered to pay over $1 million in restitution to “Vicky,” one of the people depicted in the images. Because the courts did not require a showing of proximate cause between Vicky’s losses and the appellants’ offenses, remand for that analysis was required. Furthermore, on remand, the lower courts must reconsider the extent to which appellants must pay restitution where they share responsibility for Vicky’s injuries with hundreds of other child pornography viewers.

3. United States v. Ramirez, First Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to conspiracy to distribute and distribution of crack cocaine. He was sentenced to 13 years in prison. Because the record was unclear as to whether the court applied an enhancement for knowingly or intentionally using a minor person when committing the offenses, remand was required to resolve this question.

4. United States v. Hunter, Seventh Circuit: The district court properly granted appellant’s motion to suppress statements he made to police after asking for his attorney. Because appellant unambiguously and unequivocally invoked his right to counsel, the officers should have stopped questioning him. As a result, the statements appellant made after asking for his attorney were properly suppressed.

5. United States v. Bell, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiring to possess and distribute PCP. He argued that his lawyer was ineffective because the lawyer didn’t tell him that he could have received a lower sentence under the “safety valve” provision of the Guidelines. Appellant also said his lawyer was ineffective because the lawyer didn’t request a continuance at the sentencing hearing when it became apparent that appellant didn’t about the safety valve. Because the record suggested a serious possibility that the lawyer was ineffective and that this ineffectiveness prejudiced appellant, remand was proper to resolve this uncertainty.

6. United States v. Moore, Fourth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of carjacking, using a firearm in the carjacking, and conspiracy. Because the district court erred in denying appellant’s motion for a new trial, which was based in part on newly discovered evidence that a picture of a potential suspect in the underlying offenses was mislabeled, his conviction was vacated and the case remanded for a new trial.

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It’s a scattershot collection of sentencing remands in this week’s short wins.

Also, Happy Belated President’s Day everyone, or, as OPM says, happy Washington’s Birthday:

This holiday is designated as “Washington’s Birthday” in section 6103(a) of title 5 of the United States Code, which is the law that specifies holidays for Federal employees. Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is our policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.

Used car dealers with their “President’s Day Sales” may differ though.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Battle, Tenth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiracy to possess with an intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack. He was sentenced to 360 months in prison, and was later resentenced to 324 months after he filed a motion to reduce his sentence based on the retroactive amendment of the crack cocaine guidelines. The 324-month sentence was based in part on the court’s finding that appellant was responsible for more than 3.4 kilograms of crack. Because the record did not support attributing this amount to appellant, the court reversed and remanded for resentencing.

2. United States v. Epps, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of various drug offenses under a Rule 11(c)(1)(C) plea agreement. He was sentenced to 188 months in prison followed by five years of supervised release. The court had jurisdiction to hear the appeal notwithstanding appellant’s release from prison and the start of his supervised release. The appeal was not moot because appellant’s term of supervised release may be impacted by the outcome of the appeal. Finally, appellant was entitled to a reduction of his sentence under the revised guidelines. For these reasons, the case was reversed and remanded.

3. United States v. May, Ninth Circuit: Appellants pled guilty to receipt of stolen mail and mail theft. The court’s loss calculation included expenses the U.S. Postal Service (“USPS”) incurred to avert future thefts. The court improperly ordered restitution for USPS’ expenses because the mail theft of which the defendants were convicted occurred after, and could not have caused, USPS’ delivery procedure change. As a result, the portion of the restitution order awarding restitution for USPS’ expenses was vacated.

4. United States v. Patrick, Seventh Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to sex trafficking and was sentenced to 360 months in prison, to be served consecutive to a 20-year state court sentence appellant was serving. Because the court failed to discuss appellant’s cooperation with authorities, appellant’s sentence was vacated and the case remanded for further proceedings.

5. United States v. Capers, et al., Eleventh Circuit: Bishop Capers, Leon Frederick, and Larry Little were convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and crack cocaine. The court ruled that the Fair Sentencing Act, which reduced the guidelines ranges for the offenses at issue, did not apply to Mr. Capers and Mr. Little’s sentencing guidelines calculations because their offenses were committed before the Act was passed. This was error. Consequently, Mr. Capers and Mr. Little’s sentences were vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.