Articles Tagged with 404(b)

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Child porn cases are turning out to be a surprisingly large portion of what’s in federal court.

Child pornography is gross and wrong, to be clear. But these cases are, I think, a symptom of a larger problem.

All of us have times in our lives when we’re in the wilderness, when we feel adrift and alienated and unsure of where we’re going or where we are. Some folks in this time of life turn to alcohol, Some turn to drugs, video games, or other ways to keep themselves from facing the great chasm of dissatisfaction that their lives have become. “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desparation” and all that.

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It is rare and wonderful to see an entrapment opinion. And United States v. Kopstein fits the bill.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Kopstein, Second Circuit: Appellant was convicted by a jury of transporting and shipping child pornography. During trial, Appellant’s sole defense was entrapment. The conviction was vacated and the case remanded because the jury instruction on entrapment failed to consistently and adequately guide the jury. Here, a jury instruction on the lesser-included offense of possession would allow the jury to return a verdict of guilty on the transporting and shipping charge, even if the jury found Appellant not guilty of possession. This was confusing because it would allow the jury to render a verdict of guilty on the greater offense even if the prosecution had failed to prove a necessary part of its case (the lesser offense).

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I spend a decent amount of time talking to people who have been charged with a crime. Perhaps more than most people. It is amazing how many people’s understanding of the law differs from what the law actually is.

The double jeopardy clause may be the part of the criminal law least understood by people who are not in the criminal justice system. The double jeopardy clause prevents the federal government, or a state government, from prosecuting you twice for the same crime.

Here are some things that the double jeopardy clause does not prevent: