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It’s been a big week for resentencings – especially in the Sixth and Seventh Circuits.

The DC Circuit came in with an important decision on the BOP’s Inmate Financial Responsibility Program. The Ninth Circuit weighed in on supervised release conditions in a sex case.

Though, really, six opinions from our federal circuits last week and all of them involve a resentencing. It’s a sad kind of winning.

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Daniel Castro was a high-ranking person in the Philadelphia Police Department. And the Third Circuit’s opinion in his case – United States v. Castro – may just be the most awesome published opinion I’ve seen in months.

Mr. Castro was charged with three separate extortion conspiracies and also with making a false statement to federal agents – a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1001.

The jury hung on the extortion charges. They convicted on the false statement charge.

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In a criminal case, most lawyers need to figure out what motions to file. A big part of this is to sit down with the government’s evidence and try to figure out what parts of the government’s case came from something that violated the constitution.

It’s frustrating when some part of the evidence came from a search warrant – challenges to search warrants are tricky, because a judge already signed off on the warrant. It’s not to say it can’t be done, it’s just different than challenging, say, if the FBI ran into a client’s office and took a bunch of stuff without a warrant.

Sometimes you can challenge a warrant if the affidavit in support of the warrant clearly didn’t establish probable cause to think there was going to be evidence where the cops searched.

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It’s a good week in the circuits for folks accused of federal crimes.

The Seventh Circuit has been active (though sadly without Judge Posner). United States v. Diaz-Rios looks interesting – it’s a remand for resentencing in a mitigation role case. Personally, I think the mitigating role reduction is too rarely applied (though I would say that). I’m always happy to see pro-defendant law made on that guideline.

Perhaps most interesting, though, is United States v. Doe – a Ninth Circuit discovery violation case. Looks like all of DOJ’s Brady training may not have eliminated the whole problem. Shocking.

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Our brave new world of internet technology is encouraging innovation of all kinds. Innovation of new ways to interact with each other, new ways to learn, new ways to work, new ways to embezzle and create records of one’s embezzlement, and new ways for the government to try to prosecute.

In United States v. Phillips, the Ninth Circuit – in an opinion written by S.D.N.Y. SuperJudge Rakoff sitting by designation – brushed back a prosecution for embezzlement from a tech company.

1369865_mailbox.jpgThe government, you see, prosecuted a former CEO of a tech company for mail fraud.

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Marc Engelmann was accused of conspiracy to commit bank and wire fraud, as well as bank and wire fraud. He was convicted at trial after some very shady stuff might have happened between two FBI agents. The Eighth Circuit (yes, the Eighth Circuit!) remanded in United States v. Engelmann.

Dual Price Real Estate Deals

Mr. Engelmann was a real estate attorney. He represented a seller in nine different deals that the government thought broke the law.

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Perhaps our nation’s circuit court judges took it easy last week because of the inauguration, or Martin Luther King Jr. Day, but there’s only one case where a defendant won in a published opinion in a federal appellate court.

That said, it’s a great win — sufficiency of the evidence reversal from the Eleventh Circuit.

In other news, vaguely related to this blog, I was quoted in the Baltimore Sun, talking about the prospects for Supreme Court review of a Fourth Circuit case involving a federal habeas challenge to a state conviction.

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Two doctors, married to each other, were accused of health care fraud. They pled guilty and fought at sentencing about the amount of the restitution that they would have to pay back to the insurance companies for what they did. And, in United States v. Sharma, the Fifth Circuit held that a district court can’t just make up a restitution number.

Dr. Arun Sharma and Dr. Kiran Sharma ran two pain management clinics in Texas.

1028452_syringes_and_vial.jpgAt these clinics, the Doctors Sharma would give pain injections to patients. The health care fraud involved “paravertebral facet-point injections.”

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Tamatha Hilton was the bookkeeper for a company called Woodsmith’s. Woodsmith’s made furniture. Ms. Hilton made bad decisions.

Specifically, for a few years, she took checks written by Woodsmith’s customers and gave them to her husband, Jimmy Hilton. Mr. Hilton did not work at Woodsmith’s.

Mr. Hilton gave the checks to his ex-wife, Jacqueline Hilton. Ms. Hilton opened a bank account at Suntrust in her name, saying that she was the owner of a company called Woodsmiths Furniture Company.

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It’s hard not to want to celebrate the orderly processes of government on the day after a Presidential Inauguration.

Though, for those of us who represent people accused of crimes, the “orderly processes of government” may feel a bit different. It’s good that we don’t have lynch mobs or posses with pitchforks chasing people who we think have violated the norms of our society.

But, as our President reminded us yesterday, our journey is not complete. Of course, most folks agree with the President that our journey is not complete until women earn equal pay, same sex couples can marry, voting rights are meaningful, and immigrants are welcomed.