Articles Posted in Interpreting Statutes

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Lester and Nancy Sadler, a husband and wife, ran a series of pain management clinics in Ohio.

As the Sixth Circuit explained, “these were not conventional plain clinics.” For example, at one clinic

patients would arrive well before it opened, filling the clinic’s parking lot and the lots of nearby businesses. While waiting for the clinic to open, the patients used drugs and traded prescription forms for cash in the parking lots. The patients often traveled long distances (and in large groups) to come to the Sadlers’ shops, sometimes as much as 316 miles in a roundtrip, even though most of the patients lived much closer to other clinics.

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When you go to a restaurant, you have to pay for the meal – there’s a quid pro quo. But you don’t have to leave a tip (we’re leaving aside situations where you have a large party and they automatically add 18%). A tip you leave because you want to note and appreciate the service you received. Maybe a tip is expected, but a waiter can’t sue you for not leaving one.

So too with bribes, gratutities, and law makers. If a member of Congress makes a deal with you where you’ll give him $10,000 in exchange for voting for your favorite bill, that’s a bribe. But if he votes for your favorite bill and then you send him $10,000 because you’re excited about his vote, that’s a gratuity.

As the Supreme Court has said,

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Does marriage fraud happen in the marriage, or at the wedding? As it happens, marriage fraud, at least according to the Eleventh Circuit, is a bit of a misnomer – it’s really better thought of as wedding fraud.

The statute is 8 U.S.C. § 1325(c). It says that it’s a marriage fraud whenever “[a]ny individual who knowingly enters into a marriage for the purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws.” The case is United States v. Rojas.

2.jpgYunier Rojas and Soledad Marino were friends. Good friends, but just friends. Apparently not even friends with benefits. Just friends.

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United States v. Izurieta is an odd opinion. Turns out the Eleventh Circuit was a very good defense attorney in this case.

Two brothers – Yuri and Anneri Izurieta – ran an import/export business. They brought food into the United States from Central America.

999830__3.jpgThey were charged with not following FDA procedures when they brought food into the country that – according to a trial stipulation – contained e coli and salmonella.

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Tamatha Hilton was the bookkeeper for a company called Woodsmith’s. Woodsmith’s made furniture. Ms. Hilton made bad decisions.

Specifically, for a few years, she took checks written by Woodsmith’s customers and gave them to her husband, Jimmy Hilton. Mr. Hilton did not work at Woodsmith’s.

Mr. Hilton gave the checks to his ex-wife, Jacqueline Hilton. Ms. Hilton opened a bank account at Suntrust in her name, saying that she was the owner of a company called Woodsmiths Furniture Company.

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Sometimes a boat ride – a three hour cruise – can take you places you could never have anticipated.

For Yimmi Bellaizac-Hurtado, Pedro Felipe Angulo-Rodallega, Albeiro Gonzalez-Valois, and Luis Carlos Riascos-Hurtado, a ride in a wooden boat off the coast of Panama took them to the Eleventh Circuit, the Bureau of Prisons, and through the heart of the Constitution’s grant of power to Congress to make laws to punish “Offenses against the Law of Nations.”

Welcome to the Jungle

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If you’re ever involved in a bank fraud case, you should probably read the Second Circuit’s opinion reversing Mr. Felix Nkansah’s bank fraud conviction. If the government wants to convict someone for bank fraud, the Second Circuit says they’ve got to show that the person was trying to defraud a bank (as opposed to trying to defraud someone or something else).

The Company You Keep

Felix Nkansah fell in with some bad company.

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Ronda Nixon’s career was on the upswing. She had logged her time as a Mary Kay Cosmetics representative. She had spent time in a job working at a small law firm – first as an assistant and then she worked her way up to bookkeeper and paralegal.

Finally, she was ready to make her move. She left her old jobs behind to go to law school. She was moving on up.

1031341_makeup_kit.jpgUnfortunately, her former boss – Garis Pruit – took ill. While he was recovering from surgery, he received a call from the bank.

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Glorious Shaver, Andrew White, and Jermel Lewis knew of a speakeasy in North Philadelphia.

A woman named Jeanette Ketchmore would buy bottles of booze and sell drinks from then for four or five dollars in her home. Some of those bottles of booze crossed state lines before making it to Ms. Ketchmore’s house.

1254218_glass_of_whiskey.jpgShe was not licensed by the state or local government to provide these drinks.

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It’s exceptionally rare for the Fourth Circuit to reverse a life sentence for someone who caused another person to die in the course of a botched bank robbery. And when the panel that heard the appeal has both Judges Wilkinson, and Niemeyer – whoa nelly – that’s one whopper of a government error.

1097248_guard_with_machine_gun.jpgA Bank Robbery Gone Bad

September 28, 2008 did not turn out the way Larry Whitfield had planned.