Articles Posted in How We Treat People

Published on:

People are social animals. We teach each other. We learn from each other. We judge each other.

Perhaps dozens of times a day we make evaluations about other people based on how they look at us and what they say to us. We make determinations about other people based on race and class and whether we think another person is “one of us” – in all the ways that a person can be one of us. Maybe pheromones play a role in how we evaluate each other. But these small judgments we make in our interactions with others shape how we treat each other in ways large and small.

None of this goes away when a judge puts on a robe and imposes a sentence on a person who has been convicted of a crime.

Published on:

For a person convicted of a crime, winning in the Supreme Court of the United States can be a mixed bag.

Sometimes it works out well. Clarence Gideon was acquitted when he was retried, this time with the aid of a defense lawyer. He was also, of course, lovingly portrayed by Henry Fonda in film, and is now perhaps the most often-invoked indigent of the Twentieth Century.

657704_supreme_court.jpgOn the other hand, Ernesto Miranda, the man who gave us Miranda warnings, was convicted on retrial after his statement was suppressed. He served 11 years in prison for rape.

Published on:

Sometimes being a defense lawyer in federal court is a matter of playing for dropped balls. In some cases, if everything goes the way it looks like it should for the government, there’s not much chance of a good result. But, mistakes are often made. If the right mistakes happen, things can look different quickly.

877665_sport_balls_1.jpgThe appeal in the First Circuit’s recent opinion in United States v. Ortiz shows the importance of playing for a dropped ball.

A Night in May

Published on:

In a classic Simpsons episode, Homer Simpson, as a young person, is excluded from a club of his peers – the club is called the “No Homers Club.” Homer complains, noting that there was a Homer inside the clubhouse.

He’s told – “It says no Homers. We’re allowed to have one.” (Incidentally, the “No Homers Club” is now the name of many Simpsons fan clubs).

DSC01433_z.JPGClub rules tend, I think, to be silly. The Seventh Circuit’s recent opinion in United States v. Loughry however, meant the difference in whether a child pornography conviction stands can depend on the rules of a private “club.”

Published on:

The Wrong Way To Think About Punishment

When I meet people at a cocktail party, or talk to kids of elementary-school age, and they learn I’m a federal criminal defense lawyer, I’m often asked something like, “How much time do you get for bank robbery?” or, “What’s the punishment for mortgage fraud?”

The assumption is that there is a menu of punishments for crimes – if you do X, you get Y.

Published on:

One of the trickiest problems in a criminal trial, in federal court or any other court, is determining if the person accused of a crime should testify.

On one hand, the jurors instinctively want to hear what the person has to say. They’re instructed not to hold it against him if he doesn’t testify, but, as a matter of human psychology, people want the guy who just sat and listened to others say bad things about him to say something back.

Dice.jpgAnd, of course, the person on trial may have something useful to say in his own defense.

Published on:

The rumble in Rhode Island is over – Rhode Island won.

As frequent readers of this blog – and fans of the Interstate Agreement on Detainers – will recall, a fight broke out between Rhode Island and the United States Department of Justice over a man named Jason Wayne Pleau.

Rhode Island.jpgMr. Pleau appears to have killed a man in the course of a bank robbery. The bank was federally insured (like just about every other bank in the country). The United States Attorney’s Office in Rhode Island decided to bring a case against Mr. Pleau based on the charges.

Published on:

Brian Rogers learned the hard way that, sometimes, selling a computer has a downside. As many computer experts recommend, if you’re selling a computer you need to wipe the hard drive so that your financial information can’t be found by someone else.

Mr. Rogers, however, should not have been worried about the buyer of his computer finding his financial information. Rather, he should have worried about the purchaser finding his child pornography.

talk_costs_lives_vintage_us_ww2_war_poster-p228616753927944360t5wm_400Mr. Rogers was a non-commissioned Naval Officer at the Brunswick Naval Air Station in Maine. The police worked with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS, for those who don’t watch TV). Law enforcement obtained a search warrant.

Published on:

If you have had a search warrant executed at your house, you’re likely to want to know why. If you committed a crime, perhaps it’s obvious why. If not, you’d likely want to see why the government thought you were up to something suspicious.

Christopher Kortlander was in exactly that situation. In 2005 and 2008 the federal government got a warrant and searched his house. He was under investigation, as the Ninth Circuit put it, for unlawfully attempting to sell migratory bird parts and for fraudulently misrepresenting the provenance of historical artifacts for sale.”

Ultimately, the government declined to go forward with charges.

Published on:

One of the hardest things about representing a person charged with a crime in federal court is that the law is often changing. A decision that makes sense based on the law at the time, may not make sense later, if the law moves.

Fortunately, sometimes when the law changes, it changes for the better. And, sometimes when the law changes for the better, a person charged with a crime can benefit from it.

The Sixth Circuit provides a nice example of this in United States v. Cornell Smith.