Articles Posted in Fraud

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Marc Engelmann was accused of conspiracy to commit bank and wire fraud, as well as bank and wire fraud. He was convicted at trial after some very shady stuff might have happened between two FBI agents. The Eighth Circuit (yes, the Eighth Circuit!) remanded in United States v. Engelmann.

Dual Price Real Estate Deals

Mr. Engelmann was a real estate attorney. He represented a seller in nine different deals that the government thought broke the law.

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Tamatha Hilton was the bookkeeper for a company called Woodsmith’s. Woodsmith’s made furniture. Ms. Hilton made bad decisions.

Specifically, for a few years, she took checks written by Woodsmith’s customers and gave them to her husband, Jimmy Hilton. Mr. Hilton did not work at Woodsmith’s.

Mr. Hilton gave the checks to his ex-wife, Jacqueline Hilton. Ms. Hilton opened a bank account at Suntrust in her name, saying that she was the owner of a company called Woodsmiths Furniture Company.

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Alfred Caronia was a sales rep for a pharmaceutical company. And, despite what you might think by reading some of the literature, being a pharmaceutical sales rep is not a crime. It’s even more emphatically not a crime after the Second Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Caronia.

1213599_pills.jpgPart of Mr. Caronia’s job was to encourage folks to buy Xyrem.

According to the Second Circuit,

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It’s hard, when things go wrong, not to seek a mulligan. And we all get off on the wrong foot sometimes.

When a case is in front of a federal judge for sentencing, though, a mulligan is only very rarely available.

The Fifth Circuit case of United States v. Murray shows why.

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If you’re ever involved in a bank fraud case, you should probably read the Second Circuit’s opinion reversing Mr. Felix Nkansah’s bank fraud conviction. If the government wants to convict someone for bank fraud, the Second Circuit says they’ve got to show that the person was trying to defraud a bank (as opposed to trying to defraud someone or something else).

The Company You Keep

Felix Nkansah fell in with some bad company.

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Gregory Fair was an internet entrepreneur. Of sorts.

Mr. Fair’s Criminal Copyright Enterprise

He sold pirated copies of outdated Adobe software on Ebay. His customers could buy this outdated software, then, with an update code Mr. Fair was also able to provide, they could pay Adobe to upgrade their software to the most current version.

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If Mitt Romney is right that 47% of Americans think of themselves as victims, then the Second Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Lacy may be deeply unpopular.

Like Mitt Romney, Kirk Lacey and Omar Henry had a vision for the future.

Unlike Mitt Romney, their vision involved short sales, straw buyers, and a little light mortgage fraud.

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Hurricane Georges was bad for Puerto Rico. It destroyed the way of life for a number of Puerto Rican farms. The federal government offered low-interest loans to farmers who were hurt by the hurricane.

The federal government loaned this money through the Farm Services Agency. The Farm Services Agency – as the name suggests – is an agency that provides services to farms. And farmers.

1070316_orange_twister.jpgThe Farm Services Agency hired folks on the ground in Puerto Rico to process loan applications. One such person was Juan Colon-Rodriguez – his friends, including the First Circuit, just call him Mr. Colon.

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Christopher Spears was no stranger to a fake document. Though at some point, it’s about standards.

Mr. Spears had a thriving business outside of Chicago, in Lake County Indiana, making all kinds of fake identification documents – he made drivers’ licenses, handgun permits, high school diplomas, etc.

He was a bigger diploma mill than Phoenix University.

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Perhaps Ramie Marston was confused?

She filed for bankruptcy on her own – without a lawyer.

When you file for bankruptcy, you have to fill out a lot of paperwork. Here, Ms. Marston was asked what other names she’d used in the past.