Articles Posted in Fraud

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The Seventh Circuit’s opinion in United States v. Hawkins – written by Easterbrook – presents a fascinating legal defense. When is getting money from someone for side benefits from the government bribery and when is it fraud?

Mr. Hawkins and his co-defendant Mr. Racasi worked in Chicago for the Board of Review – the entity that hears tax assessment appeals. They took money from a cop – Haleem – who they thought was dirty and, in fact, was – he was so dirty he was acting as an undercover officer to work his time down on some other criminal conduct of his.

It is an interesting question whether a dirty cop who has turned cooperator because his dirtiness has led to its own charges is truly “undercover” but let’s elide over that for a minute.

Messrs. Hawkins and Racasi took Mr. Haleem’s money so that they could work some influence at the Board that lowers tax assessments on some property Haleem owned. One of the properties didn’t have its assessment reduced, but the rest did.

They were charged with bribery and fraud in connection with the bribery. They were also charged with conspiracy, but that’s just because these days AUSAs get made fun of at the NAC if they don’t add a conspiracy charge to every case.

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Restitution may be the most important issue that most criminal defense lawyers are uninterested in litigating. Folks who practice in the criminal space – even the white-collar space – tend to see themselves as a champion of liberty. They care about freedom and justice. They are significantly less interested in fighting over money.

usa-dollar-bills-1431130-m.jpgNonetheless, money is an important thing in many people’s lives. And, if a person is convicted of a crime, the government will try to take their money too – either through a fine, a forfeiture judgment, or restitution.

The Second Circuit, in United States v. Cuti, recently narrowed the scope of what expenses can be part of a restitution judgment.

Anthony Cuti was the CEO of Duane Reade until 2005. He was convicted of securities fraud after trial in connection with two accounting fraud schemes to inflate the company’s earnings. His conviction was upheld in a separate appeal – that’s not the issue in this case.

This case is all about the Benjamins.

Mr. Cuti is Fired

In 2004, Duane Reade was purchased by Oak Hill — a private equity firm. Mr. Cuti was terminated shortly after in 2005.

As sometimes happens, Oak Hill and Mr. Cuti did not agree on all of the details of how his termination should be sorted out. The case went to arbitration. Paul Weiss represented Duane Reade in the arbitration.

Shortly before the arbitration was started though, Duane Reade’s general counsel learned that there were some suspected shenanigans that involved Mr. Cuti.

The company hired Cooley to investigate.

It will surprise exactly no one that having Paul Weiss and Cooley do a bunch of legal work was really expensive.

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United States v. Fard is a nice study in the wrong way for a lawyer to handle a plea hearing.

Let me say, at the start, that I get that a plea hearing can be hard. Sometimes a lawyer sees what’s in his client’s best interests more clearly than the client. There can be a temptation to push a client really hard to take a plea when the client doesn’t want to. And getting a client who has reluctantly inked a plea through a plea hearing can also be hard.

There are few things you can do to handle that. Maybe you spend more time with the client explaining why a plea makes sense. Maybe you talk – with permission – to the client’s loved ones about whether a plea makes sense. Maybe, if the client doesn’t want to plead, you reflect that it’s the client’s Sixth Amendment right to go to trial, and not the lawyer’s and you take the case to trial.

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Does marriage fraud happen in the marriage, or at the wedding? As it happens, marriage fraud, at least according to the Eleventh Circuit, is a bit of a misnomer – it’s really better thought of as wedding fraud.

The statute is 8 U.S.C. § 1325(c). It says that it’s a marriage fraud whenever “[a]ny individual who knowingly enters into a marriage for the purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws.” The case is United States v. Rojas.

2.jpgYunier Rojas and Soledad Marino were friends. Good friends, but just friends. Apparently not even friends with benefits. Just friends.

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Bernard Kurlemann may have done many things – he borrowed millions to build a pair of houses in Mason, Ohio, for example – but he did not make a false statement to a bank.

And the Sixth Circuit, in United States v. Kurlemann, held that the district court was wrong to instruct the jury that it could convict him for anything less.

1418355_flag_blowing_in_the_breeze.jpgThe Costs of Owning Expensive Real Estate

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United States v. Izurieta is an odd opinion. Turns out the Eleventh Circuit was a very good defense attorney in this case.

Two brothers – Yuri and Anneri Izurieta – ran an import/export business. They brought food into the United States from Central America.

999830__3.jpgThey were charged with not following FDA procedures when they brought food into the country that – according to a trial stipulation – contained e coli and salmonella.

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Erica Hall was an office assistant at an OB/GYN office in Coral Springs, Florida. The job may not have paid well, because Ms. Hall was trying to make some extra cash on the side by selling patient information to some folks who would use it to get fake credit cards.

1385735_sterilisation.jpgMs. Hall was told by the folks the government described as her coconspirators that for every patient’s personal information she handed over, she’d be paid $200. If the information was able to be used to create a credit card that could be used, she’d be paid $1000 for that patient information.

Even though Ms. Hall handed over information for between 65 to 141 folks, and that 16 of those people had information that could be used to make fake credit cards, she was only paid $200.

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The federal sentencing guidelines are probably the most problematic in three areas – fraud, child pornography, and drugs.

Today’s case, United States v. Diallo, illustrates two of the big problems with the fraud guidelines. First, they’re really complicated – so complicated that federal prosecutors sometimes don’t really understand how they work. In this case, the prosecutor at sentencing took a position so clearly inconsistent with the guidelines that the government abandoned it for the appeal.

(An astute reader will notice that this means the district court went along with the federal prosecutor’s flawed guidelines understanding. It’s a shame, but c’est la guerre.).

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Daniel Castro was a high-ranking person in the Philadelphia Police Department. And the Third Circuit’s opinion in his case – United States v. Castro – may just be the most awesome published opinion I’ve seen in months.

Mr. Castro was charged with three separate extortion conspiracies and also with making a false statement to federal agents – a violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1001.

The jury hung on the extortion charges. They convicted on the false statement charge.

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Our brave new world of internet technology is encouraging innovation of all kinds. Innovation of new ways to interact with each other, new ways to learn, new ways to work, new ways to embezzle and create records of one’s embezzlement, and new ways for the government to try to prosecute.

In United States v. Phillips, the Ninth Circuit – in an opinion written by S.D.N.Y. SuperJudge Rakoff sitting by designation – brushed back a prosecution for embezzlement from a tech company.

1369865_mailbox.jpgThe government, you see, prosecuted a former CEO of a tech company for mail fraud.