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Short Wins – the Entrapment Edition

It is rare and wonderful to see an entrapment opinion. And United States v. Kopstein fits the bill.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Kopstein, Second Circuit: Appellant was convicted by a jury of transporting and shipping child pornography. During trial, Appellant’s sole defense was entrapment. The conviction was vacated and the case remanded because the jury instruction on entrapment failed to consistently and adequately guide the jury. Here, a jury instruction on the lesser-included offense of possession would allow the jury to return a verdict of guilty on the transporting and shipping charge, even if the jury found Appellant not guilty of possession. This was confusing because it would allow the jury to render a verdict of guilty on the greater offense even if the prosecution had failed to prove a necessary part of its case (the lesser offense).

Defense Attorney: Norman Trabulus
2. United States v. Caldwell, Third Circuit: Appellant’s conviction of being a felon in possession of a firearm was vacated because the district court improperly admitted evidence of Appellant’s prior convictions for unlawful firearm possession. Because the government’s theory of the case was only for actual possession, and therefore knowledge was not at issue, knowledge was not a proper reason to admit the prior prejudicial convictions under Rule 404(b).

3. United States v. Mohamed, Seventh Circuit: A jury convicted Appellant of one count of knowingly transporting and possessing contraband cigarettes. The Seventh Circuit interpreted Indian’s cigarette tax law as not applying to cigarettes merely possessed in Indiana. Since cigarettes simply passing through the state in interstate commerce do not have to bear Indiana tax stamps, the government failed to bear its burden to prove sale, use, consumption, handling, or distribution within Indiana and Appellant’s motion for judgment of acquittal should have been granted.

4. United States v. Daniels, Ninth Circuit: The Ninth Circuit vacated Appellant’s sentence and remanded for resentencing after his supervised release was revoked. It was plain error for the district court not to offer Appellant an opportunity to speak before it imposed a post-revocation sentence.

Defense Attorneys: K. Elizabeth Dahlstrom, Sean K. Kennedy, Brianna Fuller Mircheff