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Michael Begin was a MySpace user. He used MySpace not so much to keep up with fan information about Twilight, but to make the acquaintance of a fourteen-year-old girl.

Though described as a twenty-year old Marine sniper on his MySpace profile, Mr. Begin was actually a 33 year old man with a history of convictions involving underage girls.

1382778_old_brick_cell_phone.jpgMr. Begin and the fourteen year old talked on MySpace often. Their conversations were sexual in nature. He also used his cell phone to send her two pictures which were perhaps inspired by Congressman Weiner. The girls’ mother became concerned. Her daughter told Mr. Begin that she was underage. Mr. Begin was undeterred.

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How do you determine the value of a thing?

Normally, in our free-market (or heavily regulated free-market) economy, we think that the value of a thing is set by what people are willing to pay for it.

If I’ll see you my collection of neckties for $10,000, and you’ll pay $10,000 to buy my collection of neckties, then we know my collection of neckties is worth $10,000.

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Last week saw a continuation of the short win trends we’ve seen in the past — federal sex crimes are frequently represented. Though this week is heavier on reversals involving enticing a minor.

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpgThe Ninth Circuit lets a man expand the record to investigate an ineffective assistance claim, the Third Circuit finds that an argument that trying to get someone to engage in statutory rape shouldn’t be worse than actually committing statutory rape makes some sense, and a bribery conviction is reversed in the Seventh Circuit because the evidence was insufficient. It’s not a bad week in federal criminal appeals.

1. Buenrostro v. United States, Ninth Circuit: Appellant filed several postconviction claims after he was convicted of conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine and sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of life imprisonment without parole based on his two prior felony drug convictions. Of those claims, the Ninth Circuit granted appellant’s motion to expand the record, which sought to reassert a previously raised ineffective assistance of trial counsel claim based on counsel’s alleged failure to communicate a plea offer.

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Hurricane Georges was bad for Puerto Rico. It destroyed the way of life for a number of Puerto Rican farms. The federal government offered low-interest loans to farmers who were hurt by the hurricane.

The federal government loaned this money through the Farm Services Agency. The Farm Services Agency – as the name suggests – is an agency that provides services to farms. And farmers.

1070316_orange_twister.jpgThe Farm Services Agency hired folks on the ground in Puerto Rico to process loan applications. One such person was Juan Colon-Rodriguez – his friends, including the First Circuit, just call him Mr. Colon.

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Max Budziak had some child pornography on his computer.

An FBI agent, using a program developed by the FBI called EP2P, logged onto his computer through the internet and downloaded child pornography from him on two separate days in July, 2007.

1165303_green_power.jpgLimeWire and EP2P

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As in past weeks, it’s an exciting week of mainly fraud and child pornography in the federal circuits, with a heavy helping of restitution issues.

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpgIf this week generalizes (and it doesn’t) the rule is clear: if you want to increase your chances to win a federal criminal appeal, try to represent someone accused of fraud or a child pornography charge.

And be very lucky.

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Christopher Spears was no stranger to a fake document. Though at some point, it’s about standards.

Mr. Spears had a thriving business outside of Chicago, in Lake County Indiana, making all kinds of fake identification documents – he made drivers’ licenses, handgun permits, high school diplomas, etc.

He was a bigger diploma mill than Phoenix University.

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Autumn is here. With it comes a crisp feeling in the air, leaves turning, the start of the Supreme Court term on the First Monday in October (for a preview of sorts, please see my guide to bluffing your way through knowledge of the upcoming term), and a slowdown in the pace of published opinions coming from our nation’s federal appellate courts.

Why the slowdown? My suspicion is that as old law clerks leave the service of their appellate judges at the end of August to be replaced by new clerks — much as old leaves fall from trees to make way, eventually, for new buds — the work of the old clerks issues in late August and the work of the new clerks has yet to be rendered in a state fit for publication.

Though perhaps I’m mistaken.

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Perhaps Ramie Marston was confused?

She filed for bankruptcy on her own – without a lawyer.

When you file for bankruptcy, you have to fill out a lot of paperwork. Here, Ms. Marston was asked what other names she’d used in the past.

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Today’s short wins are dominated by federal sex offenses and fraud. It must be something in the water.

As the last few have been, this post contains a number of cases that were decided over the end of the summer.

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpgVery soon — perhaps even next week — the Short Wins will start to become a recap of all the published federal criminal defense wins from each of the circuits on a weekly basis. So, if you’re an criminal appellate practitioner (on the defense side), our hope is that this will soon be one stop shopping for 28(j) letters.