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Hiring is always hard, especially in a small office.

You have work that needs to be done. You can’t do it all. Maybe you’re a professional, like a doctor, and some of the work isn’t the best use of your time.

So you hire someone to help. Really, how much do you know about a person as the result of a hiring process? Yet, despite that, you give them responsibility over a portion of your business.

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Most people who are accused of a crime in federal court are unable to pay for a lawyer and have one appointed for them.

Which makes sense – a decent lawyer for a federal criminal case is expensive, the need to find a lawyer is urgent, and most people don’t have substantial liquid assets to hire one quickly.

Most people, then, are represented by either a federal public defender or an appointed attorney.

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There was only one published criminal case in the federal circuits last week where the defendant won. It’s a good case on jury instructions for missing evidence, and the short write up is below.

In other news – I stumbled across this lovely write up of a Medicare Fraud prosecution by a doctor.

I often am talking to people who are amazed at how the federal criminal justice system works when they encounter it for the first time. The article is titled “Is a charting error a federal crime?” (spoiler alert: the author thinks that it is, but shouldn’t be)

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Six new cases from the federal circuits this week. My favorite – a subjective measure, I know – is United States v. Ramirez. Any time a court, even the Ninth Circuit, vacates a drug conspiracy conviction for insufficient evidence it’s worth a read.

Last week I posted about a First Circuit case that raised, I thought, a specter of support for jury nullification. Lots of folks responded to that – it turns out that nullification is a popular topic.

On Twitter, I was directed to this recent opinion out of New Mexico on nullification. If you have time, I highly recommend it. It canvasses the history of nullification as an important part of what our criminal justice system is built on then says, basically, no.

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We have too many federal criminal laws – more than 4,000. And, as frequent readers of this blog will note, there are times when the federal government prosecutes a person that is a close call – it may or may not be a crime.

673264_hammer_to_fall.jpgFor example, in United States v. Costello, the government prosecuted a woman for giving her boyfriend a ride from the bus station on the theory that this was “harboring” an illegal alien. (read my prior write-up on the case here).

In marginal cases like these, the defense normally argues that this is government overreaching. The government normally brushes aside this argument saying, in essence, “trust us.” “We,” the government continues, “have scarce resources and good judgment. We won’t prosecute anyone except for really bad people.”

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There are a handful of resentencing remands in the federal courts last week.

Perhaps most interesting is United States v. Francois, remanding because the sentence imposed exceeded the statutory maximum. One doesn’t see that too often (though it’s preserved in even the most aggressive appeal waivers – I think of it as a theoretical thing rather than a real meaningful risk, but, hey, last week was the week.).

To the victories!

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October 29, 2007 started bad for Cortez Fisher.

He walked out of his house and the Baltimore police approached him (he lived in Baltimore). They asked to talk to him. He said no. He tried to drive away, but backed into a cop car.

He was arrested and searched – they found empty glass vials in his pants pocket.

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Many white-collar cases start the same way – a person is an entrepreneur. He has a vision for a business he’d like to build. He wants to do great things and reform an industry.

Things are going well, but he wants to move to that next level. Getting to the next level – whatever it is – takes a little faith, a little elbow grease, and, sometimes, a few cut corners.

The trouble with cutting corners is that once you start to cut them, then get hard to uncut. The corner cutting gets baked into your business model. At some point, the cost of fixing the corner cutting exceeds what you think you can spend on it.

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Last week was a great week for folks appealing a federal conviction.

In United States v. Garrido and again in United States v. Cone fraud convictions were reversed by the Ninth Circuit and the Fourth Circuit. Separately, in the Ninth Circuit, a conviction was reversed and remanded for a Miranda violation in United States v. Barnes.

There was also a bit of news in the continuing budget problems plaguing federal defender’s offices – two federal judges wrote a nice op-ed in the Washington Post about the problem.

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Bernard Kurlemann may have done many things – he borrowed millions to build a pair of houses in Mason, Ohio, for example – but he did not make a false statement to a bank.

And the Sixth Circuit, in United States v. Kurlemann, held that the district court was wrong to instruct the jury that it could convict him for anything less.

1418355_flag_blowing_in_the_breeze.jpgThe Costs of Owning Expensive Real Estate