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When you go to a restaurant, you have to pay for the meal – there’s a quid pro quo. But you don’t have to leave a tip (we’re leaving aside situations where you have a large party and they automatically add 18%). A tip you leave because you want to note and appreciate the service you received. Maybe a tip is expected, but a waiter can’t sue you for not leaving one.

So too with bribes, gratutities, and law makers. If a member of Congress makes a deal with you where you’ll give him $10,000 in exchange for voting for your favorite bill, that’s a bribe. But if he votes for your favorite bill and then you send him $10,000 because you’re excited about his vote, that’s a gratuity.

As the Supreme Court has said,

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It’s been a busy week in the circuits. But first, two news items.

Eric Holder Walks Back The War On Drugs

Today, as has been widely reported, Eric Holder will announce that “widespread incarceration at the federal, state and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable.” Here’s coverage at the Wall Street Journal.

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Placido Mendoza drove a truck from North Carolina to Tennessee. His passenger was Abel Tavera.

Tavera was a roofer. He later said (to a jury) that he thought he was going to Tennessee to see a construction project.

23.jpgThe truck had construction equipment in it. And a bucket containing nails.

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Does marriage fraud happen in the marriage, or at the wedding? As it happens, marriage fraud, at least according to the Eleventh Circuit, is a bit of a misnomer – it’s really better thought of as wedding fraud.

The statute is 8 U.S.C. § 1325(c). It says that it’s a marriage fraud whenever “[a]ny individual who knowingly enters into a marriage for the purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws.” The case is United States v. Rojas.

2.jpgYunier Rojas and Soledad Marino were friends. Good friends, but just friends. Apparently not even friends with benefits. Just friends.

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Two bits of news before we get to the short wins:

ABA Blog Nominations

First, this is the last week you can tell the ABA Law Journal what you think about this blog – or any other law-related blog – as they prepare their list of the top 100 law-related blogs in the country (or world, or multiverse).

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It’s a bit of a sleepy week in the circuits, but not too sleepy in the news.

BOP Coverts Danbury to a Men’s Prison

In Slate, Yale law professor Judith Resnik wrote about the problems facing female inmates in the Bureau of Prisons (hat tip to Todd Bussert’s BOP Blog).

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It’s been a busy week in the federal circuits – lots of good wins to check out.

Also, while I’m shamelessly pimping, please check out an article I wrote for the National Law Journal here about DOJ prosecutions, pleas, and why the law ought to be clearer.

To the victories!

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John Doe (not his real name – but the guy shouldn’t be singled out any more than he already has been. If you really want to see his name, it’s on the opinion from the Fourth Circuit) wanted to have gay sex with a stranger.

Instead of going online like a normal person, he went to a national park in North Carolina. Mr. Doe was in his sixties – apparently baby boomers don’t use Grindr.

Mr. Doe was not the only person in the park looking for men who were looking to have sex with strangers. In response to a complete absence of real crime anywhere in North Carolina, law enforcement was there too.

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Dear Readers,

Apologies for posting so sparsely lately. Between covering the end of the Supreme Court term for Above the Law (see posts here or here if you’d like) and this day job as a lawyer, I’ve been remiss in keeping you up to date on what’s what in the circuits.

Today, please find the Short Wins for the last two weeks. My personal favorite is United States v. Huizar-Velazquez because there simply isn’t enough law on criminal importation of wire hangars.

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Today’s featured case is United States v. Hampton for a few reasons.

First, it’s from the DC Circuit, and my office is in DC – our Circuit’s pro-defendant decisions are particularly exciting (to me).

Second, it involves law enforcement agents offering expert testimony. Law enforcement testimony is massively frustrating – it feels, at times, that there no bounds to what an FBI Agent will testify about.