July 5, 2013

Short Wins - Fourth of July Week Edition

Today's featured case is United States v. Hampton for a few reasons.

First, it's from the DC Circuit, and my office is in DC - our Circuit's pro-defendant decisions are particularly exciting (to me).

Second, it involves law enforcement agents offering expert testimony. Law enforcement testimony is massively frustrating - it feels, at times, that there no bounds to what an FBI Agent will testify about.

Third, it comes out of a retrial. Who doesn't love a retrial?

Though, I should say, there are plenty of other great cases in this week's Short Wins.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Buffer, Sixth Circuit: The district court erred in denying appellant's motion to suppress evidence gathered from a search warrant and arrest because it incorrectly determined that (1) the warrant was supported by probable cause and (2) even if the warrant wasn't supported by probable cause, the good faith exception to the warrant requirement applied. Because of these errors, the appellate court reversed the order denying appellant's motion, vacated appellant's conviction, and remanded for further proceedings.

2. United States v. Davis, Fourth Circuit: Appellant received a consolidated sentence for several state law violations. The court counted the sentence as at least "two prior felony convictions" under the Sentencing Guidelines career offender enhancement provision. Because appellant's consolidated sentence was a single sentence for purposes of the career offender enhancement, the court vacated appellant's sentence and remanded for resentencing.

3. United States v. Galpin, Second Circuit: Appellant moved to suppress evidence of child pornography. The court agreed with appellant that the search warrant that led to the discovery of this evidence was overbroad and that the officers lacked probable cause to conduct it. Nevertheless, the court ruled that the warrant was severable and that the images found would have been in plain view during a properly limited search. This ruling was error: because the record as to whether the warrant was severable and whether the images were in plain view was deficient, the trial court's order denying the motion to suppress was vacated and the case remanded for further proceedings.

4. United States v. Hampton, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of drug conspiracy charges after a mistrial and re-trial. At the re-trial, the district court allowed an FBI agent to give lay-opinion testimony about his understanding of recorded conversations played for the jury. Because the court failed to enforce the boundaries for this type of evidence in Federal Rule of Evidence 701, the court denied the jury the information it needed to assess the agent's interpretations. Appellant's conviction was vacated.

5. United States v. Tien, Second Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to bribery of a public official and forgery of a passport at separate conferences held 16 months apart. In both pleas, the court plainly erred when it violated Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 11, which sets forth the requirements the court must follow in determining whether a plea is voluntary. Because the pleas weren't knowingly and voluntarily entered, both were vacated and the case remanded.

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