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This week’s wins cover three circuits and four diverse areas of law.

Particularly interesting (to me) are the Fourth Circuit’s opinion holding that it may not be a crime to steal the identity of a corporation. It feels like corporate personhood and its limits are popping up in all sorts of ways these days.

The Eighth Circuit has an interesting jury instruction issue in a sexual assault case, and, remarkably, the First Circuit has a remand based on the sufficiency of the evidence in a marijuana conspiracy case. A good set of wins all around.

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It’s hard, when things go wrong, not to seek a mulligan. And we all get off on the wrong foot sometimes.

When a case is in front of a federal judge for sentencing, though, a mulligan is only very rarely available.

The Fifth Circuit case of United States v. Murray shows why.

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Sometimes a boat ride – a three hour cruise – can take you places you could never have anticipated.

For Yimmi Bellaizac-Hurtado, Pedro Felipe Angulo-Rodallega, Albeiro Gonzalez-Valois, and Luis Carlos Riascos-Hurtado, a ride in a wooden boat off the coast of Panama took them to the Eleventh Circuit, the Bureau of Prisons, and through the heart of the Constitution’s grant of power to Congress to make laws to punish “Offenses against the Law of Nations.”

Welcome to the Jungle

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It’s an odd week for wins in the federal appellate courts.

The Second Circuit ruled that the First Amendment protects (some kinds of) promotional activity for off-label use of drugs. Any time the First Amendment is intersecting with criminal law it makes for good reading – expect fuller coverage later this week.

The Eighth Circuit sent a Fair Sentencing Act case back for resentencing, and there was a bizarre grenade case from the Eighth Circuit as well. Good Times.

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I strongly suspect that many of our nation’s circuit court judges worked over the Thanksgiving break, because they’re back with nine wins for folks accused of crimes in our nation’s federal appellate courts.

It’s a potpourri of cases – multiplicity in the sale of Bald Eagle Parts, an innocent spouse issue in a restitution award, the reduction of a fine in an Ernst & Young tax shelter fraud case, and a few Fourth Amendment cases.

Heck, there’s even a case on a Rule 41 motion. When’s the last time you saw a federal appeals court issue a published opinion on a motion for the return of property?

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It would be hard to overstate the impact of the Supreme Court’s recent cases on the Confrontation Clause.

Starting with Crawford v Washington, the Court has given much more meat to the requirement that if testimony is going to be used against someone in a criminal case, the person giving the testimony has to be in the courtroom and actually testifying.

Some of these changes are slow moving. Even though Crawford was decided in 2004 – whether business records provide an exception to the confrontation requirement has been a little unclear. Happily, the First Circuit clarified that business records are not automatically excluded from the Confrontation Clause.

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After yesterday’s heady news from the ABA Law Journal (did I mention you can vote for this blog here), I completely neglected to, you know, actually blog. Apologies.

Here are brief treatments of the wins from the week with Thanksgiving in it. Like Thanksgiving leftovers, there’s not a lot here to be tremendously excited about, but, if you’re really into yams and there are yams in the fridge, you’re happy.

To carry the metaphor forward, let’s hope you’re really into sentencing remands.

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I’m grateful that the ABA Law Journal has, again, decided this is one of the 100 best law-related blogs in the country.

That’s right, your very own Federal Criminal Appeals Blog is on the 2012 ABA 100 list.

Here’s what the ABA Law Journal said about the blog:

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It’s a slow week here in the federal circuit courts, at least for people accused of a crime who won their cases – only three cases were reversed in the federal court of appeals in published opinions last week.

Happily, what last week’s opinions lost in quantity they made up in quality.

Judge Posner weighed in on restitution in child porn cases. Always a fun writer to read.

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If you’re ever involved in a bank fraud case, you should probably read the Second Circuit’s opinion reversing Mr. Felix Nkansah’s bank fraud conviction. If the government wants to convict someone for bank fraud, the Second Circuit says they’ve got to show that the person was trying to defraud a bank (as opposed to trying to defraud someone or something else).

The Company You Keep

Felix Nkansah fell in with some bad company.